3 Mandela Effects That Will Blow Your Mind (incl. PROOF)

3 Mandela Effects That Will Blow Your Mind (incl. PROOF)

August 10, 2019 28 By William Hollis


The Mandela Effect is emerging as the foremost
paranormal phenomenon of the moment. Although the internet term was coined by paranormal
enthusiast Fiona Broome in 2010, the Mandela Effect can be more formally defined as a form
of confabulation, a psychiatric term used to describe the disturbance of memory. Many people – mostly total strangers – claim
to remember the exact same events with the exact same details. However, these events never happened; at least
not according to history books, newspaper archives, and most bizarrely – most of the
population. Yet, many of the things which people claim
to be examples of the Mandela Effect simply aren’t. Alleged changes to the names of food products
or film titles can be attributed most simply to misremembering of spelling or grammar,
especially in cases where our brain is trying to make sense of something it perceives as
illogical or inherently incorrect. Or, in the worst instances, a Mandela Effect
may be incorrectly perceived simply because of poor research. So, in attempt to get to the heart of this
mystery, we have chosen what we believe to be three of the best and most detailed examples
of the Mandela Effect. The origin of the term Mandela Effect comes
from the iconic figure himself, Nelson Mandela. This is in reference to the large, and growing,
community of people who are certain that the South African anti-apartheid revolutionary,
Nelson Mandela died whilst in prison in the 1980s – and not in 2013 as the history books
would have it. These memories are reported as being incredibly
vivid and laden with detail. Many remember ongoing funeral coverage in
the aftermath of his alleged passing, with people citing CNN and other news outlets. “I also remember reading the newspaper and
all the hoopla about Nelson Mandela dying on tv. I remember the banners at his funeral. I am an adult and take such history seriously. When he was released from prison I was flabbergasted.” Yet, the detail does not end with his funeral. Many people report that they remember a court
case after his death, surrounding a dispute with his widow over the rights to a book deal. They even detail charity concerts, an Oprah
special on television, and even of ensuing civil unrest in South Africa. A common detail which many people claim to
recall is the symbol of solidarity which celebrities created by wearing Mandela’s prison number
after his death. The frequency of the claims of Mandela’s
1980s death can, in part, be explained away by poor education. As some people state that they were taught
Nelson Mandela had died during history classes in the 1990s, it could be that they were simply
misinformed by teachers. Furthermore, the possibility that news outlets
incorrectly reported Mandela’s death at the time should be considered. Indeed, even more recently, news is often
misreported, even by larger news corporations. For example, how Fox News misreported that
the UK had voted to leave the UN, rather than the EU. A momentary blunder by even a local news channel
could have caused profound knock-on effects for decades to come. That being said the level of detail with which
people assert they remember Mandela’s death is hard to dismiss. The founder of MandelaEffect.com, Fiona Broomes,
has spent several years gathering people’s personal testimonies and recollections, all
of which are available on her website. These statements help to illustrate an astonishing
level of detail and surety. “Both my wife and I remember Nelson Mandela
dying in prison. Included in this memory are the funeral snippets
on TV and a legal flap over book rights involving his widow.” “I remember Nelson Mandela dying in prison
[…] I remember events after he died… like a really big Oprah episode, concerts in his
memory, celebrities ALL wearing his prison numbers, etc.” “I remember Mandela’s funeral being on
the news in the UK in the late 80′s. At the time I was just a kid and I didn’t
have a clue who Mandela was.” Some people have even attempted to cite Mandela’s
cause of death, with one commenter stating: “… I very clearly recall Mandela dying
of something like dysentery, in prison, from the “horrible living conditions” present
in the South African prison system, in either 1984 or 1985” Another testimony gives the year as 1985,
specifying that Mandela had died of tuberculosis. Bizarrely, Nelson Mandela, in reality, did
contract tuberculosis in 1988, due to the dark, damp conditions of his prison cell. Some who support the Mandela Effect have theorised
that this could have been the moment when a timeline diverged: in one version of events,
Mandela survived, and in the other, he died. Another alleged Mandela Effect are mystifying
changes to Biblical passages. Many Christians with intimate knowledge of
the Bible have expressed bewilderment at their inexplicable misremembering of certain, well-known
passages. In the King James’ Version of the Bible,
the book of Isaiah Chapter 11 Verse 6 is often cited as an example. In this verse, several pairs of animals are
mentioned, amongst them the leopard and the kid. However, it is the first pair which has caused
much confusion, due to the claim that one of the animals mentioned has changed to another. The passage, with the disputed animal, reads
as follows. What do you think the missing animal is? Whilst many believe that it should correctly
read “The lion also shall dwell with the lamb”, in reality the biblical passage states
that it is “The wolf” who “shall dwell with the lamb”. For those who have taken the time to commit
this passage to memory, the reference to a wolf instead of a lion is wholly unintelligible. Even those within ecclesiastic institutions
incorrectly remember the verse. In February 2016, a reddit user with the screenname
“Warsane” described how they visited three local churches in order to question pastors
about the changes to the passage. According to their post, none of the three
pastors they spoke with recalled a wolf being in the verse. They also explained how “One of the office
ladies I talked to while waiting to see one of the pastors was so sure I was wrong she
scrambled to break out her mother’s old bible from the 1940’s and had that bewildered
look on her face when she read the verse.” Christians are becoming increasingly worried
about what this passage change means. Certainly, the metaphorical meaning of a lion
lying with a lamb completely morphs once that lion is substituted for a wolf. What was once an image of a mighty and noble
predator protecting the weak, becomes something crafty and suspicious – a wolf in sheep’s
clothing. For some Christian’s looking to explain
this puzzle, illusions to the arrival of the Antichrist have been made. A further perplexing element is the readiness
with which one can find religious imagery of a lion and a lamb together. Why is this the case when the passage refers
to a wolf? Certainly, those who attended Christian schools
and Sunday schools as children are adamant that they remember artwork on the walls depicting
a lion and a lamb. With emphasis on memorisation of Biblical
passages being so common at the more fundamentalist of churches and religious schools, it is truly
bizarre to think that so many Christians are reimagining the verse. And, it seems as though there may be some
evidence which supports people’s remembering of a “lion”. In the 1941 biography film, Sergeant York,
a character is shown reading Isaiah 11:6 from a Bible. Gaining traction in recent months to become
possibly the most widely believed case of the Mandela Effect, is the shared recollection
of a children’s film from the 1990s titled Shazam, in which the comedian Sinbad portrayed
a genie. In spite of the Sinbad’s repeated denials
of the movie’s existence [show his tweets], an ever growing community of people are adamant
that the movie Shazam once existed. Even within the past few days, someone has
come forward claiming to have played the role of a taxi driver in this mysterious film. In fact, the reality of this non-existent
film is so strongly asserted that details of its plot and characters have been posted
online by bewildered would-be viewers. One reddit user, who adopts the screenname“EpicJourneyMan”,
describes how he managed a video rental store at the time of Shazam’s alleged release. In his post, he stated that the film plot
involved two children, an early teen boy and his younger sister, who enlist the help of
a genie, played by Sinbad, in order to restore love to their single-parent father’s life. What follows is a comedic tale set in a domestic
environment, which makes use the typical genie lore of the granting of three wishes. The final big sequence supposedly takes place
at a pool party related to the father’s work. Although the poster cannot recall the precise
ending of the film, they are certain that it culminates in a habitual, family-friendly
happy ending. Does this storyline sound familiar to you? Another astonished reddit user has described
how they and both their parents all recall watching the movie, and remember it “vividly”. They even provide a description of Sinbad’s
character’s appearance, recounting typical genie costume including “curly toed boots,
big pants” and “earrings”. Yet, for all of these descriptions and remembrances
of Shazam, there is no record of the film’s existence. Certainly, sceptics of the Mandela Effect
have put forward possible explanations for Shazam, the most notable being a similarly-titled
film from 1996, Kazaam, in which the basketball player Shaquille O’Neal stars as a wannabe
rapper genie who teams up a 12-year-old boy named Max. Although the premise of the film sounds similar,
if not identical, to the alleged Shazam movie, many assert that they distinctly remember
Kazaam as a separate film. In addition to this, some have pointed to
Sinbad’s guest appearance in a 1996 episode of Nickelodeon’s All That, when he starred
as Sinboo, father to the series’ bizarre Ishboo character. Whilst portraying the father of a foreign
exchange student whose customs were rather unusual to Americans, Sinbad’s costume in
this sketch could explain the mistaken recollections of him appearing as a genie. Other possible mix ups include the 1939 DC
comic book superhero Captain Marvel, who is also known by the name Shazam, as well as
the children’s animated show Shazzan, produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions in 1967. Featured in reruns on the Cartoon Network
channel from 1992 to the year 2000, the episodes follow the adventures of – you’ve guessed
it – two siblings who befriend an all powerful, wish-granting genie called Shazzan. Although alternative explanations have been
put forward, the original dilemma remains: a growing multitude of people have come forward
specifically claiming to remember Sinbad starring in a genie film. And, it may just be that a cryptic lead to
the elusive Shazam movie has been uncovered. During a 1992 episode of a popular sitcom,
the character of Freddie, played by actress Cree Summer, is trying to hide the scarf which
she has knitted for her boyfriend, Shazza Zulu, from her friends. In order to distract attention from what the
‘S’ and the ‘Z’ on the scarf symbolise, she says that the scarf with a ‘SZ’ could
be for ‘someone who loves shazam’. As a laugh track follows, it suggests that
the audience would have understood the reference and have found it humorous. Bizarrely, Sinbad starred alongside Cree Summer
in this very tv show until only the year before this episode, 1991. His co-stars and writers presumably would
have know where Sinbad was heading in his career, suggesting that the ‘Shazam’ reference
could have been to Sinbad’s upcoming children’s film. Yet, the most bizarre and ironic twist to
this quandary is the name of the tv show. It seems that the only remaining reference
to the non-existent Shazam film is in ‘A Different World’. If you would like to see us do a video about
possible theories and explanations of the Mandela Effect, then leave a like and comment
below.