5 Scary Demons You Should Never Summon

5 Scary Demons You Should Never Summon

September 4, 2019 100 By William Hollis


We all know that messing around with a demon
is a fools game. We’ve all heard tales of people whose curiosity
has gotten the better of them, and they’ve stared too long into the abyss – and – inevitability
– the abyss has stared back. Now – I’ve got to go ahead and say it – don’t
try this at home. Ever. But – just in case you were curious, we’ve
compiled a list of 5 Scary Demons That You Should Never, Ever Summon. You’ve been warned. What’s going on guys – it’s me, Jack Finch
– your host right here on Top 5 Scary Videos. Today we’re going to by delving into the
depths of demonology, and take a look at the most sinister – the most devious of demons
that you should keep far, far away from. Jumping in at Number 5 – we have Belial. Belial – whose name in Hebrew literally translates
to worthless – or yokeless – was canonised as the leader of the Sons of Darkness in the
Dead Sea Scrolls. If you didn’t know – the Dead Sea Scrolls
are an ancient Jewish text discovered in 1947 – which are believed to have been written
before 400 BC, and refer to a wide host of demonic beings. Seriously, it’s spooky how much they name
drop them. In these scrolls, Belial is described as both
the King of Evil and the Prince of Darkness – which has led many to believe that Belial
is a pseudonym of the Devil himself. Belial is also known as the Lord of Lies and
the Master of Deceit. Many texts refer to Belial as a devious figure,
who utilizes fornication, wealth and pollution of the sanctuary to gets what he wants. However, in the Satanic Bible, Belial’s
name is suggested to translate as “without a master” – and symbolizes independence,
self-sufficiency and personal accomplishment. It begs the question – whose side is Belial
really on? Coming up at Number 4 – we have Surgat. In Latin, Surgat literally translates to ‘rise’
– and is the physical manifestation of rebellion and opposition. His angelic opposite is Aquiel To be honest, Surgat is a minor demon – and
is pretty weak sauce compared to some of the guys on this list. But the thing that makes him pretty terrifying
– is his brush in with a particular Pope. Written between 1150 and 1227, The Grimoire
of Honorius was written by Pope Honorius the 3rd with the intention of being specifically
used by a priest. Pope Honorius was obsessed with the thought
of Satan invading the mortal realm, and so began preparing the Catholic church for a
war. He wrote down his findings in this forgotten
Grimoire, which wasn’t unearthed until 1760. Honorius began his training by purposefully
summoning demons – and then banishing them again in a sort of weird, spooky, demonic
boxing session. It proved quite effective, and the Pope soon
started to get a handle on the Armies of Hell. He’d write down the name of each demon he
fought, and leave an elaborate explanation of their strengths and weaknesses. Kind of like a Pokedex. But for demons. That is – until – he came face to face with
Surgat. All that was written in his section of the
Grimoire, was that Surgat is – he who opens all locks. That was the last demon that Pope Honorius
noted down in his book. Makes you wonder what happened, eh? Next up at Number 3 – we have the Great Duke
of Hell – Berith. Also referred to as Baal-berith – this guy
is a pretty formidable dude. Known in the Infernal Dictionary as the Great
Duke of Hell – Berith commands twenty-six legions of demons and is a pretty big player
in the fiery depths below. According to Aleister Crowley’s Illustrated
Goetia – those that attempt to speak with Berith soon learn that he’s a formidable
liar. Crowley refers to him as speaking with a clear
and subtle voice – and is a liar when not answering questions. To speak with Berith, the conjurer must wear
a silver ring and hold it clearly to their face in respect to the Great Duke. If not, Berith will consume the conjurer for
not sincerely paying their respects. Berith is often depicted as a soldier – dressed
in red clothes, riding a red horse and wearing a golden crown. His main function is to corrupt those that
crave power – and is often found lingering on both sides of war. In 1612 – a nun from Aix-en-Provence was possessed
by Berith. During the exorcism, Berith gave up his own
name – as well as the names of all the other demons possessing her – but also gave the
names of the saints who would be most effective in opposing them. That guy loves a good fight. Bringing up the rear at Number 2 – we have
Pazuzu. Dating back to ancient Mesopotamia, Pazuzu
is the king of the demons of the wind. He is the bearer of storms and the bringer
of drought, and is often depicted with the body of a man, the head of a dog and the talons
of an eagle. In the possession case of Roland Doe – the
story that inspired the exorcist, Pazuzu is the chief demon that possesses the boy. He is known to be an incredibly intelligent
demon, and is renowned for scheming and corrupting the pure of heart. He takes most pleasure though, from corrupting
the purest of the pure – and is often depicted trying to possess children for sport. It is also thought that Pazuzu pre-dates most
other demons, and is thought to be an Obyrith – an ancient evil that manifested itself from
the abyss – and has been tied to Earth for millions of years. Strangely though, Pazuzu finds reference in
a huge number of ancient societies. From Mesopotamia, to Sumeria, to Ancient Babylon. In some – he is revered as a saviour and protector. Others – a demon who should never be summoned. Followers of the Obyrith often carve wooden
statues of the demon – and worship him in the hope that Pazuzu will one day reveal his
true name to them. No thanks. And coming in at the top spot – Number 1 – we
have, Azazel. Azazel – or Satan, or Lucifer – or the Devil
– or Baphomet. You know this guy. He’s the king of all demonic possession
– and he loves nothing more than a group of teenagers standing around a pentagram and
beckoning him forward into the mortal realm. The Horned Prince is heavily related to the
image of the goat – and we often see him depicted with hooves, horns and a tail – but this /actually/
has some substance to it. In Abrahamic society, a Priest would whisper
the prayers of a village into the ears of a goat – and then sacrifice it in hopes that
their prayers would be answered. But – in fear of Azazel corrupting the goat
– they’d select an extra goat – often referred to as a scapegoat, and use it as a decoy. They’d then send it out into the desert
– hoping they’d wasted a little bit of the Devil’s time. Now, we all know that’s probably not the
case. He’s a tricky one. In the Dead Sea Scrolls, Azazel is referred
to in the Book of Giants – and connects him with the story of the fallen angels. In this, he teaches men the art of war and
also teaches women the art of witchcraft and painting the body. Generally, Azazel pops up in pretty much every
possession story ever. And it’s probably wiser to just avoid him
all together. Speak of the Devil, and the Devil shall appear. That’s all we’ve got time for today guys
– we hope you’ve enjoyed this video as much as we have. Make sure to leave a comment in the box down
below. I’ve been your host Jack Finch. You’ve been watching Top 5 Scary Videos. And until next time, take it easy.