GHOST GLITCH EFFECT in Premiere Pro (Antman & The Wasp)

GHOST GLITCH EFFECT in Premiere Pro (Antman & The Wasp)

December 5, 2019 100 By William Hollis


This video is brought to you
by Videoblocks [Suspense music] -Catch! -Okay, okay. [Cinecom’s intro music] What’s up folks, Jordy here for cinecom.net
and you’re watching Copy Cat Friday! Every week we look for a creative way
to recreate an effect from a film or music video. And today we are having a look
at the Ghost effect, the super villain in the new
Ant-Man and the Wasp film. Because… you know: just a few
people where asking for it. We’re going to create this
inside Adobe Premiere Pro and I think you’re going to be pretty amazed
at how simple it’s going to be. But first up a quick shoutout
to our sponsor Videoblocks! For a single price per year you can
download unlimited video assets from their growing library, such as stock clips,
After Effects templates, video effects, overlays
and a ton more. You can check it out yourself by clicking
the first link in the description below! Now let’s create a costume
and build a film set! [Hip Hop music fades in] -So, as you can see, we built a mask
from Ghost, from Ant-man, and one tip when you’re making
costumes or masks for cosplay, use this wire. very handy when sculpting. [Music] -Lorenzo! Zip me up! -There is no zipper. -Ha, ha! This one is a totally not put-in scene. -This here is actually
a stormtrooper suit that we once used to create
a massive cloning effect. It was a pretty cool video. You can find a link to it in the
description below, if you like so. You wanna film yourself in front
of a green-screen. And we are using a portable
chroma frame, which is something that I can
definitely recommend to anyone! It’s pretty cheap and if you’re
doing more visual effects, you’ll be using it a lot. I’ll leave a link
to it in the description below. Film this from a tripod. -Oh, it’s not a chocolate camera. The first shot is where you
make a certain movement. Keep standing on the exact same
spot and let someone else change the shutter speed
in your camera. Set it to 1/20th of a second
to introduce more motion blur. You also wanna close your aputure now
a little bit, to compensate for the exposure. Now just film several extra movements and
these are going to be the ghosts around you. Finally, set your shutter speed back
to default and remove to green screen to film an empty space that will
function as the background. You can also choose for a different
background in post-production, just make sure the lighting on your subject
matches with the surrounding. -Yannick, catch! -Yeah! -This was not put-in scene at all! In Adobe Premiere Pro you wanna
place your empty shot on the bottom, on top of that goes a few
slower shutter speed shots. Then on top of that goes the normal
shot of you dodging something. And then again, on top of that you can place
a few more of those slower shutter speed shots. And this way we have a few ghost effects
coming from behind the main subject and a few on top. I’m going to disable the output of all the
layers except for the one on the bottom, which is our background, and
of course the layer on top. Select that top layer and head over
to the Effects Controls from where you wanna click
on the Pen tool under Opacity. This allows you to create a mask
around the green screen. Next, apply the Ultra Key effect
to this clip to remove the green. And since all of the shots are the same,
I can simply select the Opacity property and that Ultra Key effect. Copy that, and enable all
the other tracks again. Select those tracks and hit
control+V to paste the mask and the Ultra Key effect
on all of the rest. Bang, it’s that simple! Now let’s work on the
ghosts or the echoes! First let’s decrease the opacity
of all the ghosts. Set some to 20, others to 30 or 40%
to have some difference between them. Then look at the movement of your main subject
and try to match the movements of the ghosts. For example, when I move to the left,
a ghost is already moving to that point first. And you can easily change the time position
of your clips with the Slip tool in Premiere Pro. Simply drag your clip to the left or
to the right to change its IN and OUT point without moving the clip
around in your timeline. Finally, trim the ghost effects to let
them start and stop randomly. On the end though, all the ghosts
have to go somehow back… …to the ending position
of your character. What we did to synchronize that
was speeding up or slowing down some of the ghosts effects
with the Rate Stretch tool. Simply drag a clip out or in
to change its speed. This is nothing complex, but it does take some time to
align the ghost effects properly. And once you’re done, you can add
a cross-dissolve to all the ghost clips, to let them fade in and out. And now comes something
pretty amazing, guys! Now, the ghost effects should get
an RGB Glitch effect. And, if you’ve seen any tutorial
about how to create that, it always involves duplicating
the desired clip two times, extracting the red, green and blue channel
from it to blend them back together and offset it to get
the Glitch effect. It’s a ton of work, so we were looking
for an easier way to create an RGB split and… we found it! Apparently, as of the 2018
update in Premiere Pro, They’ve introduced several effects
for Virtual Reality editing. But these effects also work
for normal footage. Here we got the VR Chromatic
Aberration effect. Simply drag that to one
of the ghost effects. It will look weird at first, but that’s because you wanna drag the
Chromatic Aberration effect above the Ultra Key. With just one simple drag and drop,
you got yourself an RGB split effect! How cool is that! And you can fine-tune this Glitch more
by playing around with the RGB controls inside the effect itself. And by the way guys, finding
this VR effect has opened up a whole
new perspective! So, stay tuned for next Tuesday as we’re
going to reveal something pretty awesome! That every Premiere Pro user
is going to get wild for! So, make sure to subscribe to the channel
and click that bell icon next to it so that you definitely won’t
miss that video! So, just apply this VR Chromatic
Aberration effect to all the ghosts and set some
different RGB values. This Glitch is pretty cool, but
we want it to be more subtle, which is why we’re going to click on the Pen tool
under that Chromatic Aberration effect to draw a mask on the area that
we want to see that glitch on. Do this for all the ghost layers and make
sure it looks a little bit more random. Finally, we’re going to add a Gaussian
Blur to all the ghost layers as well. Just increase this slightly
to around 20. And this should already give
you the ghosting effect. But we’re going to do a few more
things to fine-tune it better. We ran into the issue that the speed
of the movement wasn’t fast enough. So, what I wanna do here is select
everything in my timeline except for the bottom layer,
which is our background, then right-click and choose Nest. This will group everything
together into one layer. Then right-click on the FX button in the
top left corner of that nested sequence, and choose Time Remapping: Speed. If you now take the Pen tool
from the Toolbox, you can click on the line in
that clip to create keyframes. You wanna create a point where
you want the clip to go faster and another one on the end where
it has to go back to normal speed. That line represents the speed.
So, if we lift that up from the middle, the clip will go faster between
the two keyframes. And this technique is called
Time Remapping. What you can also do is
drag open the keyframes. And this will gradually increase
the speed of the clip and make the speed change
look a lot more smoother. And now there’s one last thing I wanna do
and that is adding some additional glitch effects. To do this, I’m adding a short Adjustment
Layer to the top of my clip, and on here I apply the
VR Digital Glitch effect. And by the way guys, if you
can’t find these effects, then make sure to update your Creative
Cloud apps to the latest update. These are just built-in plugins! So, from this effect I’m going to
animate the Master Amplitude to let the glitch fade in
and out shortly. And to make sure that it’s more alive I’m also
going to animate the Distortion Evolution. And this will give some more random
movement to the glitch. Now, of course we only want this glitch
to appear on the subject itself, so that’s why I’m going to click on the Pen
tool under the VR digital glitch effect and draw a rough mask
over the subject. And once that is done also make
sure to feather the mask a tiny bit. And then just simply duplicate
that adjustment layer to multiple places
over your edit where ever you wanna see
this additional glitch. [Music] So, the next time that you see
an ant or a wasp, just simply turn into Ghost
and destroy them! Thank you so much for watching,
thank you Videoblocks for the support, and like always: stay creative! -Watch out kids, it’s danger here! -Danger… dangerous! -It’s dangerous here. [Yannick speaking in French] -Jordy is officially becoming Ghost. -Boohoo! -Ah! My nose!