Netflix original series Jinn criticised for ‘immoral scenes’, disregard for Arabic culture

Netflix original series Jinn criticised for ‘immoral scenes’, disregard for Arabic culture

September 11, 2019 0 By William Hollis


A top Jordanian prosecutor is calling for Netflix to pull its first original Arabic-language series Jinn, over “immoral scenes” According to industry site Deadline, the prosecutor called for the Ministry of the Interior’s cybercrimes unit to take “immediate necessary measures to stop the broadcast ” The two scenes in question show lead actress Salma Milhis (who plays Mira) kissing two different boys The series also features discussion about alcohol and sex.  The five episode young adult miniseries, which is available to watch on Netflix in NZ, follows students on a field trip to Petras, an archeological city in Jordan    READ MORE: * Netflix now does podcasts * Jordan Watson: My wife and I were too terrified to kiss all winter  * Harvey Weinstein: How Hollywood can make it up to actresses he may have smeared * Stranger Things: Now Netflix even has an after-show  While they’re there, two jinns – one good and one evil – enter the human realm, “turning high school into a supernatural battleground ”  A jinn is a supernatural spirit from Arabic mythology, which sits below the level of angels and devils  The Britannica database describes them as “beings of flame or air who are capable of assuming human or animal form and are said to dwell in all conceivable inanimate objects—stones, trees, ruins—underneath the earth, in the air, and in fire ”  The criticisms continued on Twitter, where Ahmed Al-Neama said it completely disregarded Arabic culture  “[Jinn] as an idea was great but the execution was horrible, distasteful, and borderline pornographic The thing that I am really upset about is that it feels that the show-runners wanted to please the western audience with disregarding the Arabic culture,” he said    The public criticisms led Jordan’s Royal Film Commission to release an official statement via Twitter, clarifying that it doesn’t look into scripts for locally shot series, and that it is an “issue of personal choice to watch or not watch content that we may not all agree agree upon ”  Netflix Middle East has also responded, saying it “will not tolerate” the “wave of bullying” bring directed at the actors and staff who worked on the series  “Our position has always been centred around the values of diversity and inclusiveness, so we are working to provide a safe space for all fans of the series and films around the region ”