Top 10 Scariest Demons and Creatures

Top 10 Scariest Demons and Creatures

November 7, 2019 100 By William Hollis


Hey YouTube, Jim here! Welcome to Top10Archive! Theologies throughout time and across the
globe have manifested inspirational stories and tales of wonder, but they’re also responsible
for breathing life into unspeakable terrors. Demons serve a multitude of purposes and vary
from religion to religion, but if there’s one constant, it’s that we’re glad these
top ten most terrifying demons don’t exist… we hope. Before we get started, be sure to subscribe
to the channel, and afterwards leave us a comment because we’re always looking to engage
in interesting conversations with you! Also, don’t forget to click the bell so you
get notified every time we put out a new video! 10. Asag
According to Sumerian lore, the Asag is an unpleasant sight to behold, believed to be
so ugly that its appearance was enough to make fish boil in rivers. What makes it so ugly, you ask? Consider a large beast, rounded with six total
appendages, no neck, multiple eyes, and skin as hard as rock. Despite its looks, the Asag, which is said
to have had a strange relationship with the mountains that spawned an army of rock-like
offspring, was a plague demon, connected to head fevers and paralysis of those he infected. 9. Aldinach
Bred from the mind of ancient Egyptians and popularized by Dungeons & Dragons, Aldinach
is a demon lord with control over the desert sands and certain weather phenomena. Said to be behind the fiercest of storms,
Aldinach is the daughter of Lamashtu and takes the form of an imposing, giant scorpion with
razor-sharp claws. Furthering her grotesque image is a human
head, lodged beneath a carapace that’s covered in smaller scorpions. Worshiping this scorpion queen is no easy
feat, requiring a subject to lie in the Sun for an hour before consuming a live scorpion. 8. Lady Midday
A fiend of the day, Lady Midday, or Poludnitsa, haunted Slavic villages not in the shadows,
but in the light of noon. Depicted either as an innocent young girl,
stunning lady, or a wicked wench, Lady Midday traveled as a cloud of dust and carried a
scythe used for far deadlier purposes than reaping crops. Those that encountered Lady Midday were engaged
by the creep with a series of questions or conversation. Should they answer a question wrong or try
and change the topic, the demoness would either decapitate them or, if the mood struck, simply
bequeath them with heatstroke. 7. Malphas
As Satan’s second in command, Malphas is an evil force to be reckoned with. Under his command are 40 legions of demons,
eager to act on his word, but that’s not even the worst of it. Though not petrifying in appearance, the demon
masquerades as a large raven and is a deceptive creature, even to those that worship him. Those that summon Malphas are in for an unwanted
surprise for the demon is willing to accept sacrifices but is deceptive to those performing
the sacrifice. To those that oppose him, Malphas has the
ability to destroy their desires or make their deepest thoughts known. 6. Incubus & Succubus
It’s hard enough to get a date these days without having to worry about whether your
beau will bleed you dry. Literally. The incubus and succubus are two entities
cut from the same cloth, a pair of Lilin-demons that seduce men or women while they sleep. The incubus is known for lying with women
while the succubus lies with men, appearing frequently as seductive beings to either drain
them of their life force or, depending on the lore, procreate. The earliest mention of the incubus dates
back to 2400 BC on the Sumerian King List where Gilgamesh’s father is listed as Lilu,
or a demon similar to an incubus, and the duo have roots in Christian folklore. 5. Dzoavitz
This ghastly form is depicted in Shoshonean mythology as a towering ogre with a hunger
for raw eggs. Dzoavitz was said to have stolen the Sun and
has been accused of kidnapping children, often depicted as dove’s eggs. While trying to steal the dove’s eggs, Dzoavitz
was tricked into jumping into a hole dug by a badger. Legend has it that the towering demon, sometimes
referred to as a stone giant, is still stuck in the hole, which may or may not be Devils
Hole in Nye County, Nevada. Though the ogre had chased after the dove’s
eggs, the monstrosity is often associated with cannibalism. 4. Bukavac
Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water… Sporting six legs, twisted horns, a long tail,
and slick flesh, this Slavic demon was said to terrorize the region of Srem, or Syrmia,
between the Danube and Sava rivers. More than just hideous to look at, the Bukavac
lurks in swamps, rivers, and other small bodies of water, awaiting unsuspecting prey to lunge
at. Escaping the grasp of the beast wasn’t easy,
especially as it suffocated the life out of its victims. The demon was named for the Slavic word for
noise, buka, due to the unsettling, loud sounds it was believed to make after nightfall. 3. Andras
First written in the Ars Goetia a selection from the Lesser Key of Solomon depicting 72
demons evoked by Solomon, Andras sports a unique, albeit confusing and terrifying look. Marquis Andras, or the Night Demon, was a
spirit in the form of an angel, depicted with a black raven’s head and riding on the back
of a large black wolf with a saber at hand. Andras was the 63rd spirit conjured by Solomon
and commanded over the 30 legions of spirits, though his greatest skill was giving advice
on killing one’s opponent and worsening quarrels between factions. 2. Abaddon
Though often referred to as a physical place, in Job 28:22, Abaddon was personified as a
corporeal being. In Hebrew, the demon king’s name means “to
destroy,” and, according to Revelation 9:11, after the trumpet of the fifth angel is blown,
Abaddon will emerge with an army of horse-like locusts sporting human faces, women’s hair,
and lions’ teeth under his command. The monstrosity of Abaddon has been mentioned
in multiple texts as the “Angel of Death” or “Angel of the Abyss,” but it was Protestant
commentator Matthew Henry who proposed that the demon was the Antichrist. Over 160 years later, the Jamieson-Fausset-Brown
Commentary suggested Abaddon to be Satan himself, a concept echoed by the Latter-Day Saints. 1. Surgat
In The Grimoire of Pope Honorius, there is mention of a lesser demon known for being
a deceptive little creature that’s sly enough to make him dangerous. Dubbed the “One Who Opens All Locks,”
Surgat is bestowed with the ability to unlock any lock in the world, meaning hiding from
him is no easy feat. In fact, a victim targeted by Surgat is forced
into a pursuit that is almost guaranteed to end with the demon reaching his mark. Legend has it that those caught by Surgat
go mad over images presented to them by the demon. Thanks for watching! If you enjoyed this video or it sent a few
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