Top 15 Haunted Hotels With Real Ghost Sightings

Top 15 Haunted Hotels With Real Ghost Sightings

September 10, 2019 100 By William Hollis


Number 15. Banff Springs Hotel: One of the many Canadian
architectural achievements, The Banff Springs Hotel is located in Banff, Alberta, in the
middle of the Rocky Mountains. It was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway
as part of a series of hotels they constructed across Canada, and is built around some of
the natural hot springs. The hotel is allegedly home to several spirits
and further mysterious within. One famous spirit of the premises is that
of the late bellman, Sam, who reportedly threatened to haunt the place after his death. It appears Sam kept his promise, but has been
said to be a benevolent spirit; guests have reported being helped to their rooms by an
elderly Scottish gentleman, matching Sam’s description. He also is said to randomly open and close
the hotel doors, not to scare guests but as his way of saying “hello”. By far the most famous ghost at Banff Springs
is the Doomed Bride. Guests have claimed to see a woman in a bridal
gown dancing in the main ballroom, but disappears upon further investigation. The hotel’s main historian has stated the
apparition is probably that of a woman who fell from the curve stone steps and died before
her wedding banquet that same day. Then, there is the legend of the missing Room
873. The legend goes a family was murdered in Room
873, and the murderer was never caught. After the room was refurbished and bookings
there recommenced, guests sleeping there would constantly report various disturbing incidents,
claiming they heard hallow screams, lights flickering and turning on at random, and even
bloody handprints on the mirror of the bathroom. As the legend goes, the hotel owners decided
to stop letting out the room, and instead had it drywalled over. To this day, hotel staff are forbidden to
speak about the room, leading to the idea of Room 873 existing to be a credible idea. Number 14. The Coronado: A true spectacle of the Pacific
coast, the Hotel Del Coronado is located in San Diego, California, and is a magnificent
resort for those who can round up the cash to stay there. Fans of classic Hollywood will recognize the
Coronado as a main centre piece of the film Some Like It Hot. However, there are stories of an unhappy spirit
wandering the halls. Back on Thanksgiving day, 1892, 24 year old
Kate Morgan checked into the Coronado, claiming to be waiting for a young gentleman to join
her. Five days later, hotel staff discovered her
dead from a self inflicted gunshot wound to her head. Kate had been married, but was estranged from
her husband, so people believe she was making a liaison with her lover, but he had either
been delayed, sidetracked or simply stood her up, leaving her alone and unhappy. Guests who have stayed in Kate’s room since
have claimed the lights will flicker, the television turns itself on and off, an unexplained
breeze will rush by them, and the temperature will suddenly get very cold without logical
explanation. Guests have also seen a young woman walking
around the halls, and their description matches those of Kate, leading people to believe she
is still waiting for her lover to arrive and take her away. The gift shop has also reported strange occurrences,
with products flying off the shelves, but landing upright and unbroken. The Coronado remains a beautiful resort, and
guests have stated the spirits are friendly, albeit a little mischievous. Number 13. Roosevelt Hotel: Hollywood isn’t always full
of fame and glamour, but also of heartbreak, deceit and even murder. The Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel is a historic
building in the middle of Tinsel Town, with its opening in 1927, the beginning of Hollywood’s
Golden Age, and since then has gained both a famous and infamous reputation, and is said
to be the final residence of several stars of the big screen. Marilyn Monroe’s ghost has been reportedly
been seen reflected in the mirrors of the hotel’s ballroom, and once guests turn to
get a glance, she has vanished. Montgomery Clift stayed in room 928 during
the filming of From Here to Eternity, and people have said they could hear a trumpet
playing from the room, which Clift was talented at. Cole spots are also frequent around the building,
particularly the ballroom. A man in a white suit has been seen playing
the piano on the Ballroom, and when guests approach to comment on his talented playing,
he will vanish right before their eyes. The wife of Clark Gabel, Carole Lombard, has
also been spotted on the 12th floor, where she and Gable often stayed together. The most famous and mysterious spirit of the
Roosevelt is that of a little girl named Caroline, who has been seen wearing a blue dress, pony-tail,
and skipping down the hallways and around the fountain in the main lobby. Because of the number of alleged Hollywood
figures haunting the Roosevelt, tourists flock there and try to get a reservation in the
hopes of catching a glimpse of Marilyn or hear the soothing tune of Montgomery’s trumpet. Number 12. Brown Palace: Denver’s most luxurious hotel,
the Brown Palace has stood for over a century and hasn’t ever been closed for even a single
day since its opening in 1892. Named for the builder Henry Cordes Brown,
the Brown Palace has gained a reputation for being a high-class place for visitors, which
include celebrities and politicians, including several presidents. However, the palace has gained several spiritual
residence over the many years of operation, gaining it notoriety as one of Denver’s most
haunted locations. Tours are offered of the hotel, and the famous
story told by guides is that of the legend of room 904. Between 1940 and 1955, a wealthy socialite
Louise Crawford Hill resided in the room,until she died of heartbreak. The room underwent renovations after, but
the main lobby would still receive calls coming from room 904, despite the room being unavailable
to guests; on the other end of the line, the reception could only hear strange vibrations. In 1961, the calls ended as mysteriously as
they began, coincidentally around the time tour guides stopped telling the story of Miss
Hill. Many believe the calls were Miss Hill protesting
her story being told, and her way of asking for her to be at peace in the room she continues
to call her home. A former employee of the hotel claimed he
heard strange noises coming from the main dining room; when he went to investigate,
he found an entire string quartet practising in the room. He confronted the band, asking what they were
doing, and they replied “Don’t worry, we live here.” Furthermore, guests and staff have seen apparitions
dressed in formal attire. However, the spirits do not appear to be malicious,
and simply wish to rest in peace within their favourite hotel in the Colorado capital. Number 11. The Ragged Cot: A place that appears frozen
in time, The Ragged Cot Inn of Minchinhampton, UK is itself a time capsule and resembling
much of how it did back in its early days. The beginning of the Inn’s tragic history
dates back to December 1760; then landlord Bill Clavers prepared to rob a midnight stagecoach
bound for London. His wife, with their child in hand, begged
him not to go through with the crime, but in a fit of anger he pushed her aside, sending
her flying down the stairs. In his drunken confusion, he fled the house
and robbed the coach. Upon returning to the Inn, he was horrified
to discover his wife and child did not survive their plummet down the stairs. Panicked, Clavers hid the bodies in the trunk,
then paced around the Inn trying to think of what to do. Meanwhile, local constables followed Clavers’
footprints in the snow, and surrounded the building. As they prepared to enter, they heard the
scream of Clavers, who claimed to have seen the apparition of his wife crossing the up
stairs door way. Constables subdued Clavers and tied him to
a chair as they searched the premises. Inside, they were horrified to come face-to-face
with the apparition of Clavers’s wife, and they fled the house. Finally, when sunrise broke, the constables
continued their search and discovered the bodies of Clavers’ wife and child. Now confirmed a guilty man, Clavers was tried
and executed by hanging. Those staying at the Inn are often told by
the locals about the sightings of apparitions as they knock back drink after drink, and
each has their own story to tell about the Ragged Cot Inn. Number 10. The Queen Mary: For those wanting a unique
hotel experience, they should seek out the Queen Mary. The Queen Mary Hotel was once a luxury cruise
liner for the Cunard Line from 1936 until being retired in 1967. Since then, it has rested permanently in the
Long Beach harbour, acting as a hotel, restaurant and museum. However, the ship is said to house the restless
spirits of former crew and guests. During the Second World War, the Queen Mary
was converted into a troop transport vessel; by the war’s conclusion, the ship had transported
over 800,000 troops to nearly every Allied campaign. After, the Queen Mary transported thousands
of war brides and war babies, in what became known as the Bride and Baby Voyages. The Queen Mary is said to be very haunted,
as there were 49 reported deaths during its service and from the horrors of the war. The infamous Door 13 crushed two men to death
at different points of the cruise’s operation. Spirits are often observed in the First and
second class swimming pools; even though neither are no longer functioning and are used for
different purposes, ghosts are said to be seen swimming and splashing away in the water
wearing 1930s swimwear. The Queen’s Salon hosts the ghost of a beautiful
young woman wearing a formal white evening gown, and she has been sighted dancing alone
in the dark corner. The Queen Mary has become a landmark of Long
Beach, and the spirits resting there have found themselves imbedded within the floating
treasure. Number 9. The Empress Hotel: Those who visit Victoria,
British Columbia agree the city is beautiful and rich with history and culture. The most prestiged hotel is by far the Empress
Hotel, now operated by Fairmont. The hotel opened in 1908 and further extensions
were added in 1909, 1914 and 1928. Of course, the hotel is also rumoured to be
haunted by various spirits who at one point stayed in one of the many rooms there. Several people have reported an apparition
of a man with a thin mustache wandering the halls with a cane in hand. Historians believe this matches the description
of Francis Rattenbury, the hotel’s architect. There have also been reports of a mysterious
little girl haunting the hotel, and she frequents the elevators as that’s where the room she
died in used to be; it was demolished in order to expand the number of elevators due to the
hotel’s increased popularity. Guests have complained of mysterious knocks
on their doors, but nobody being present upon investigation. Most agree the spirit is harmless, and simply
a child acting normally for her age, just wishing to play pranks and play with the guests. The Empress’ resident spirits seem to be harmless,
with Rattenbury simply wishing to forever reside in his proudest achievement, and the
little girl wanting to play and have a laugh by joking around with the guests and staff. Number 8. The Place d’Armes Hotel: A building full of
bad luck and unhappy history, the Place d’Armes is one of the most extravagant landmarks of
the New Orleans French Quarter. It was originally built as military quarters
in 1735, and was later converted into a school. The school tragically burned down in the Great
New Orleans Fire of 1788, killing the headmaster and several students. Now operating as a hotel, guests and staff
have reported many bizarre and unexplainable incidents occurring in the rooms and halls. One woman discussed how she went out on her
balcony to get a view of the French Quarter, and began a conversation with a man in the
adjacent balcony from her. The conversation was friendly for its duration,
but when the woman spoke about it with reception, she was shocked to learn no one was staying
in the room at that time. Guests have also heard children laughing,
despite none staying in the rooms nearby, and feeling as if someone is watching them
from the bathroom as they sleep. A bearded man has been seen wandering around
the building and its courtyard, and it is believed to be the ghost of the former headmaster,
peacefully strolling his former workplace. With New Orleans having a reputation as the
most-haunted city in America, it will come as no surprise the oldest hotel happens to
be the most haunted. Number 7. Chateau Laurier: Canada’s capital of Ottawa
is famous for its spectacular architecture, from the Houses of Parliament, to the various
museums the city has to offer. One of the city’s jewels is the Chateau Laurier,
one of the Canadian Pacific Railway hotels and sister of hotels such as the more famous
Chateau Laurier in Quebec City and Banff Springs hotel in Alberta. Built in 1912, the hotel was named for Sir
Wilfrid Laurier, the seventh Prime Minister of Canada and the country’s first French-speaking
prime minister. The man who commissioned the Laurier, Charles
Melville, was bound for Canada in order to attend the opening ceremony, but was unfortunate
to have sought passage on the Titanic; he was one of the many souls lost on the ship,
just 12 days before the hotel’s completion. Guests and staff have seen a ghost wandering
the halls, and descriptions match Melville, leading many to believe he has chosen his
hotel as his final resting place as he was unable to see it in life. Various famous historical figures, both Canadian
and international, have been spotting in the Laurier, including Canadian humourist Stephen
Leacock, Albert Einstein, and even Winston Churchill, all of whom were known to frequent
the Laurier during their visits to Ottawa. Guests have written reviews of the hotel detailing
their paranormal experiences, but all seem to agree it has not deterred their wish to
return, and the Chateau Laurier continues to be a highly regarded hotel in the great
white north. Number 6. Ross Castle: With a history as rich as Ireland’s,
it’s no surprise the island will have its fair share of spirits, on top of its legends
and mythical creatures. All around the small country are castles,
imbedding the history of struggle between the Irish people and the English rulers who
constantly ravaged the lands. Ross Castle is one particular location; located
along the shores of Lough Sheelin, Ross Castle has become not only an historic landmark,
but also a popular Bed and Breakfast. However, with the long history of conflict
and turmoil, the Castle has its share of spirits. The ghosts are said to be the victims of the
notorious Richard Nugent, appropriately nicknamed The Black Baron. He once accused a beggar of having a dog steal
bread, and had the beggar hung on the spot. A cross now stands where the gallows once
were. Guests and staff speak of a ghostly figure
riding a horse around the grounds, but he is said to be a sign of good fortune, and
those who see him have had great luck placed upon them. Therefore, not all the spirits within Ross
Castle are malevolent, and guests have generally reported a peaceful stay while there, stating
there was nothing too scary that would not make them wish to return. Number 5. Castle Leslie: If you’ve ever wanted to stay
in a castle, Ireland is the place to go. Castle Leslie is a genuine medieval castle
dating back to the early 1600s, originally home to Bishop John Leslie. It was passed down from generation to generation,
and is currently owned by Samantha Leslie. Guests, staff, and even Samantha herself have
claimed to see various spirits within the walls, all ranging from a variety of time
eras. Various people have seen a man in monk robes
in the banquet hall, who appears very tall and dressed in black. Despite the intimidating look, the monk is
said to be very pleasant, giving people positive emotions, saying friendly greetings, and has
become fond of the co-owner, Con Ryan. Those who frequent the Geraldine Bedroom have
said there is a presence of a child there, and people have reported hearing a child whimper
inside. The most famous room in the Castle is the
Red Room, where the spirit of Norman Leslie supposedly resides. Norman was killed in action during the early
days of the First World War. Norman’s mother, Lady Marjorie, awoke one
night to find a ghost searching through her drawers. In them were stacks of letters, and Majorie
stated it appeared as if Norman was looking for a particular one. Marjorie asked “Why Norman – what are
you doing here?” and to her shock and comfort, Norman turned and smiled, a bright light illuminating
from him. He then faded away and darkness returned to
the room. There are further spooky encounters within
the halls of Castle Leslie, but it is best to let any curious listeners to venture over
and experience them for themsselves. Number 4. Hotel Chelsea: New York, New York, it’s a
hell of a town. While home to many landmarks, the Hotel Chelsea
has seen its share of celebrity visitors, making it a haven for fans of classic and
modern stars. Numerous musicians and writers have called
the Chelsea their home during its 100 plus years of operation, including Dee Dee Ramone,
Tom Waits, Jim Carroll and Ethan Hawke. Sci-Fi author Arthur C. Clarke wrote the renowned
2001: A Space Odyssey while residing there, leading many to believe the place is a haven
for creativity. Unfortunately, much more lingers in the halls
and rooms of the historical building. Punk musician Sid Vicious lived there with
his girlfriend, Nancy, and it was the site of Sid’s horrific drug-fueled murder of Nancy;
she is said to now be one of the resident ghosts who now haunt the hotel, due to the
horrific nature of her death. Writer Dylan Thomas died of pneumonia in room
206, and guests have reported the feeling of a presence in that room ever since. Celebrity guests of the hotel have even claimed
to have experienced paranormal activity in the Chelsea, with Janis Joplin recalling “A
lot of funky things happen in the Chelsea.” Tourists flock to the Chelsea, not only to
see the landmark as it has always been, but also in hopes of catching a glimpse of their
favourite celebrity, which may be from beyond the grave. Number 3. The Queen Anne: Standing in beautiful San
Francisco, the Queen Anne Hotel has become a favourite place for guests, tourists, special
events and weddings. It was originally built as a girls-boarding
school, which closed in 1896. It was damaged during the 1906 earthquake,
and continued to go through various owners and purposes during the 20th century. Number 15. Banff Springs Hotel: One of the
many Canadian architectural achievements, The Banff Springs Hotel is located in Banff,
Alberta, in the middle of the Rocky Mountains. It was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway
as part of a series of hotels they constructed across Canada, and is built around some of
the natural hot springs. The hotel is allegedly home to several spirits and further mysterious
within. One famous spirit of the premises is that of the late bellman, Sam, who reportedly
threatened to haunt the place after his death. It appears Sam kept his promise, but has been
said to be a benevolent spirit; guests have reported being helped to their rooms by an
elderly Scottish gentleman, matching Sam’s description. He also is said to randomly open
and close the hotel doors, not to scare guests but as his way of saying “hello”. By far
the most famous ghost at Banff Springs is the Doomed Bride. Guests have claimed to see
a woman in a bridal gown dancing in the main ballroom, but disappears upon further investigation.
The hotel’s main historian has stated the apparition is probably that of a woman who
fell from the curve stone steps and died before her wedding banquet that same day. Then, there
is the legend of the missing Room 873. The legend goes a family was murdered in Room
873, and the murderer was never caught. After the room was refurbished and bookings there
recommenced, guests sleeping there would constantly report various disturbing incidents, claiming
they heard hallow screams, lights flickering and turning on at random, and even bloody
handprints on the mirror of the bathroom. As the legend goes, the hotel owners decided
to stop letting out the room, and instead had it drywalled over. To this day, hotel
staff are forbidden to speak about the room, leading to the idea of Room 873 existing to
be a credible idea. Number 14. The Coronado: A true spectacle
of the Pacific coast, the Hotel Del Coronado is located in San Diego, California, and is
a magnificent resort for those who can round up the cash to stay there. Fans of classic
Hollywood will recognize the Coronado as a main centre piece of the film Some Like It
Hot. However, there are stories of an unhappy spirit wandering the halls. Back on Thanksgiving
day, 1892, 24 year old Kate Morgan checked into the Coronado, claiming to be waiting
for a young gentleman to join her. Five days later, hotel staff discovered her dead from
a self inflicted gunshot wound to her head. Kate had been married, but was estranged from
her husband, so people believe she was making a liaison with her lover, but he had either
been delayed, sidetracked or simply stood her up, leaving her alone and unhappy. Guests
who have stayed in Kate’s room since have claimed the lights will flicker, the television
turns itself on and off, an unexplained breeze will rush by them, and the temperature will
suddenly get very cold without logical explanation. Guests have also seen a young woman walking
around the halls, and their description matches those of Kate, leading people to believe she
is still waiting for her lover to arrive and take her away. The gift shop has also reported
strange occurrences, with products flying off the shelves, but landing upright and unbroken.
The Coronado remains a beautiful resort, and guests have stated the spirits are friendly,
albeit a little mischievous. Number 13. Roosevelt Hotel: Hollywood isn’t
always full of fame and glamour, but also of heartbreak, deceit and even murder. The
Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel is a historic building in the middle of Tinsel Town, with its opening
in 1927, the beginning of Hollywood’s Golden Age, and since then has gained both a famous
and infamous reputation, and is said to be the final residence of several stars of the
big screen. Marilyn Monroe’s ghost has been reportedly been seen reflected in the mirrors
of the hotel’s ballroom, and once guests turn to get a glance, she has vanished. Montgomery
Clift stayed in room 928 during the filming of From Here to Eternity, and people have
said they could hear a trumpet playing from the room, which Clift was talented at. Cole
spots are also frequent around the building, particularly the ballroom. A man in a white
suit has been seen playing the piano on the Ballroom, and when guests approach to comment
on his talented playing, he will vanish right before their eyes. The wife of Clark Gabel,
Carole Lombard, has also been spotted on the 12th floor, where she and Gable often stayed
together. The most famous and mysterious spirit of the Roosevelt is that of a little girl
named Caroline, who has been seen wearing a blue dress, pony-tail, and skipping down
the hallways and around the fountain in the main lobby. Because of the number of alleged
Hollywood figures haunting the Roosevelt, tourists flock there and try to get a reservation
in the hopes of catching a glimpse of Marilyn or hear the soothing tune of Montgomery’s
trumpet. Number 12. Brown Palace: Denver’s most luxurious
hotel, the Brown Palace has stood for over a century and hasn’t ever been closed for
even a single day since its opening in 1892. Named for the builder Henry Cordes Brown,
the Brown Palace has gained a reputation for being a high-class place for visitors, which
include celebrities and politicians, including several presidents. However, the palace has
gained several spiritual residence over the many years of operation, gaining it notoriety
as one of Denver’s most haunted locations. Tours are offered of the hotel, and the famous
story told by guides is that of the legend of room 904. Between 1940 and 1955, a wealthy
socialite Louise Crawford Hill resided in the room,until she died of heartbreak. The
room underwent renovations after, but the main lobby would still receive calls coming
from room 904, despite the room being unavailable to guests; on the other end of the line, the
reception could only hear strange vibrations. In 1961, the calls ended as mysteriously as
they began, coincidentally around the time tour guides stopped telling the story of Miss
Hill. Many believe the calls were Miss Hill protesting her story being told, and her way
of asking for her to be at peace in the room she continues to call her home. A former employee
of the hotel claimed he heard strange noises coming from the main dining room; when he
went to investigate, he found an entire string quartet practising in the room. He confronted
the band, asking what they were doing, and they replied “Don’t worry, we live here.”
Furthermore, guests and staff have seen apparitions dressed in formal attire. However, the spirits
do not appear to be malicious, and simply wish to rest in peace within their favourite
hotel in the Colorado capital. Number 11. The Ragged Cot: A place that appears
frozen in time, The Ragged Cot Inn of Minchinhampton, UK is itself a time capsule and resembling
much of how it did back in its early days. The beginning of the Inn’s tragic history
dates back to December 1760; then landlord Bill Clavers prepared to rob a midnight stagecoach
bound for London. His wife, with their child in hand, begged him not to go through with
the crime, but in a fit of anger he pushed her aside, sending her flying down the stairs.
In his drunken confusion, he fled the house and robbed the coach. Upon returning to the
Inn, he was horrified to discover his wife and child did not survive their plummet down
the stairs. Panicked, Clavers hid the bodies in the trunk, then paced around the Inn trying
to think of what to do. Meanwhile, local constables followed Clavers’ footprints in the snow,
and surrounded the building. As they prepared to enter, they heard the scream of Clavers,
who claimed to have seen the apparition of his wife crossing the up stairs door way.
Constables subdued Clavers and tied him to a chair as they searched the premises. Inside,
they were horrified to come face-to-face with the apparition of Clavers’s wife, and they
fled the house. Finally, when sunrise broke, the constables continued their search and
discovered the bodies of Clavers’ wife and child. Now confirmed a guilty man, Clavers
was tried and executed by hanging. Those staying at the Inn are often told by the locals about
the sightings of apparitions as they knock back drink after drink, and each has their
own story to tell about the Ragged Cot Inn. Number 10. The Queen Mary: For those wanting
a unique hotel experience, they should seek out the Queen Mary. The Queen Mary Hotel was
once a luxury cruise liner for the Cunard Line from 1936 until being retired in 1967.
Since then, it has rested permanently in the Long Beach harbour, acting as a hotel, restaurant
and museum. However, the ship is said to house the restless spirits of former crew and guests.
During the Second World War, the Queen Mary was converted into a troop transport vessel;
by the war’s conclusion, the ship had transported over 800,000 troops to nearly every Allied
campaign. After, the Queen Mary transported thousands of war brides and war babies, in
what became known as the Bride and Baby Voyages. The Queen Mary is said to be very haunted,
as there were 49 reported deaths during its service and from the horrors of the war. The
infamous Door 13 crushed two men to death at different points of the cruise’s operation.
Spirits are often observed in the First and second class swimming pools; even though neither
are no longer functioning and are used for different purposes, ghosts are said to be
seen swimming and splashing away in the water wearing 1930s swimwear. The Queen’s Salon
hosts the ghost of a beautiful young woman wearing a formal white evening gown, and she
has been sighted dancing alone in the dark corner. The Queen Mary has become a landmark
of Long Beach, and the spirits resting there have found themselves imbedded within the
floating treasure. Number 9. The Empress Hotel: Those who visit
Victoria, British Columbia agree the city is beautiful and rich with history and culture.
The most prestiged hotel is by far the Empress Hotel, now operated by Fairmont. The hotel
opened in 1908 and further extensions were added in 1909, 1914 and 1928. Of course, the
hotel is also rumoured to be haunted by various spirits who at one point stayed in one of
the many rooms there. Several people have reported an apparition of a man with a thin
mustache wandering the halls with a cane in hand. Historians believe this matches the
description of Francis Rattenbury, the hotel’s architect. There have also been reports of
a mysterious little girl haunting the hotel, and she frequents the elevators as that’s
where the room she died in used to be; it was demolished in order to expand the number
of elevators due to the hotel’s increased popularity. Guests have complained of mysterious
knocks on their doors, but nobody being present upon investigation. Most agree the spirit
is harmless, and simply a child acting normally for her age, just wishing to play pranks and
play with the guests. The Empress’ resident spirits seem to be harmless, with Rattenbury
simply wishing to forever reside in his proudest achievement, and the little girl wanting to
play and have a laugh by joking around with the guests and staff. Number 8. The Place d’Armes Hotel: A building
full of bad luck and unhappy history, the Place d’Armes is one of the most extravagant
landmarks of the New Orleans French Quarter. It was originally built as military quarters
in 1735, and was later converted into a school. The school tragically burned down in the Great
New Orleans Fire of 1788, killing the headmaster and several students. Now operating as a hotel,
guests and staff have reported many bizarre and unexplainable incidents occurring in the
rooms and halls. One woman discussed how she went out on her balcony to get a view of the
French Quarter, and began a conversation with a man in the adjacent balcony from her. The
conversation was friendly for its duration, but when the woman spoke about it with reception,
she was shocked to learn no one was staying in the room at that time. Guests have also
heard children laughing, despite none staying in the rooms nearby, and feeling as if someone
is watching them from the bathroom as they sleep. A bearded man has been seen wandering
around the building and its courtyard, and it is believed to be the ghost of the former
headmaster, peacefully strolling his former workplace. With New Orleans having a reputation
as the most-haunted city in America, it will come as no surprise the oldest hotel happens
to be the most haunted. Number 7. Chateau Laurier: Canada’s capital
of Ottawa is famous for its spectacular architecture, from the Houses of Parliament, to the various
museums the city has to offer. One of the city’s jewels is the Chateau Laurier, one
of the Canadian Pacific Railway hotels and sister of hotels such as the more famous Chateau
Laurier in Quebec City and Banff Springs hotel in Alberta. Built in 1912, the hotel was named
for Sir Wilfrid Laurier, the seventh Prime Minister of Canada and the country’s first
French-speaking prime minister. The man who commissioned the Laurier, Charles Melville,
was bound for Canada in order to attend the opening ceremony, but was unfortunate to have
sought passage on the Titanic; he was one of the many souls lost on the ship, just 12
days before the hotel’s completion. Guests and staff have seen a ghost wandering the
halls, and descriptions match Melville, leading many to believe he has chosen his hotel as
his final resting place as he was unable to see it in life. Various famous historical
figures, both Canadian and international, have been spotting in the Laurier, including
Canadian humourist Stephen Leacock, Albert Einstein, and even Winston Churchill, all
of whom were known to frequent the Laurier during their visits to Ottawa. Guests have
written reviews of the hotel detailing their paranormal experiences, but all seem to agree
it has not deterred their wish to return, and the Chateau Laurier continues to be a
highly regarded hotel in the great white north. Number 6. Ross Castle: With a history as rich
as Ireland’s, it’s no surprise the island will have its fair share of spirits, on top
of its legends and mythical creatures. All around the small country are castles, imbedding
the history of struggle between the Irish people and the English rulers who constantly
ravaged the lands. Ross Castle is one particular location; located along the shores of Lough
Sheelin, Ross Castle has become not only an historic landmark, but also a popular Bed
and Breakfast. However, with the long history of conflict and turmoil, the Castle has its
share of spirits. The ghosts are said to be the victims of the notorious Richard Nugent,
appropriately nicknamed The Black Baron. He once accused a beggar of having a dog steal
bread, and had the beggar hung on the spot. A cross now stands where the gallows once
were. Guests and staff speak of a ghostly figure riding a horse around the grounds,
but he is said to be a sign of good fortune, and those who see him have had great luck
placed upon them. Therefore, not all the spirits within Ross Castle are malevolent, and guests
have generally reported a peaceful stay while there, stating there was nothing too scary
that would not make them wish to return. Number 5. Castle Leslie: If you’ve ever wanted
to stay in a castle, Ireland is the place to go. Castle Leslie is a genuine medieval
castle dating back to the early 1600s, originally home to Bishop John Leslie. It was passed
down from generation to generation, and is currently owned by Samantha Leslie. Guests,
staff, and even Samantha herself have claimed to see various spirits within the walls, all
ranging from a variety of time eras. Various people have seen a man in monk robes in the
banquet hall, who appears very tall and dressed in black. Despite the intimidating look, the
monk is said to be very pleasant, giving people positive emotions, saying friendly greetings,
and has become fond of the co-owner, Con Ryan. Those who frequent the Geraldine Bedroom have
said there is a presence of a child there, and people have reported hearing a child whimper
inside. The most famous room in the Castle is the Red Room, where the spirit of Norman
Leslie supposedly resides. Norman was killed in action during the early days of the First
World War. Norman’s mother, Lady Marjorie, awoke one night to find a ghost searching
through her drawers. In them were stacks of letters, and Majorie stated it appeared as
if Norman was looking for a particular one. Marjorie asked “Why Norman – what are
you doing here?” and to her shock and comfort, Norman turned and smiled, a bright light illuminating
from him. He then faded away and darkness returned to the room. There are further spooky
encounters within the halls of Castle Leslie, but it is best to let any curious listeners
to venture over and experience them for themsselves. Number 4. Hotel Chelsea: New York, New York,
it’s a hell of a town. While home to many landmarks, the Hotel Chelsea has seen its
share of celebrity visitors, making it a haven for fans of classic and modern stars. Numerous
musicians and writers have called the Chelsea their home during its 100 plus years of operation,
including Dee Dee Ramone, Tom Waits, Jim Carroll and Ethan Hawke. Sci-Fi author Arthur C. Clarke
wrote the renowned 2001: A Space Odyssey while residing there, leading many to believe the
place is a haven for creativity. Unfortunately, much more lingers in the halls and rooms of
the historical building. Punk musician Sid Vicious lived there with his girlfriend, Nancy,
and it was the site of Sid’s horrific drug-fueled murder of Nancy; she is said to now be one
of the resident ghosts who now haunt the hotel, due to the horrific nature of her death. Writer
Dylan Thomas died of pneumonia in room 206, and guests have reported the feeling of a
presence in that room ever since. Celebrity guests of the hotel have even claimed to have
experienced paranormal activity in the Chelsea, with Janis Joplin recalling “A lot of funky
things happen in the Chelsea.” Tourists flock to the Chelsea, not only to see the
landmark as it has always been, but also in hopes of catching a glimpse of their favourite
celebrity, which may be from beyond the grave. Number 3. The Queen Anne: Standing in beautiful
San Francisco, the Queen Anne Hotel has become a favourite place for guests, tourists, special
events and weddings. It was originally built as a girls-boarding school, which closed in
1896. It was damaged during the 1906 earthquake, and continued to go through various owners
and purposes during the 20th century. In 1980, the new owners gave it a renovation, and opened
it as the Queen Anne B & B Hotel. Guests and staff have reported seeing an apparition which
resembles the late Mary Lake, the first owner when the building was the boarding school.
She was reportedly heartbroken after the school close and left San Francisco, never to return.
Lake is a kind spirit and is known to look after the well being of the guests, by unpacking
baggage, hanging clothes, picking up dropped objects from the floor, and even tucking the
covers over guests as they sleep. Lake takes a particular interest in people staying in
room 410, which used to be her office. She enjoys the company and seems to make sure
her guests are comfortable and cared for. Because of her generous nature, people have
flocked to the Queen Anne in the hopes of experiencing her kind heart and to learn more
about her. Mary Lake is an example of how not all ghosts are to be feared, and they
simply wish to rest and even make the living feel good while in their presence. Number 2. Ballygally Castle Hotel: Northern
Ireland is home to lush green fields, magnificent cliff views, and an abundance of history.
Ballygally Castle in Antrim was built as far back as 1625 in a French chateau style; this
architectural choice made it ideal for refurbishment as a hotel overlooking the Bay of Ballygally.
The Castle saw attacks by the Irish during the rebellion of 1641, though the offenders
were repelled. The dark history of the castle is focused on the late Lady Isobel, the wife
of James Shaw. According to the story, Isobel was unable to produce a male heir to Shaw,
giving birth only to a single daughter. Enraged, Shaw had Isobel locked and isolated in the
top corner turret of the castle until she died. Another story states Shaw discovered
Isobel was having an affair with a sailor, leading to her imprisonment in the turret.
Her spirit is now reported to haunt the room. Isobel is said to change the temperature by
raising it as high as 10 degrees. A BBC reported decided to stay in the room, but was disturbed
by a strong smell of coffee and brandy, and changes in the temperature. She fled the room
and slept elsewhere in the hotel, as far away from the turret as she could. Several spirits
of children have also been seen within the walls, and guests have awoken to the feeling
of hands pushing and pulling them, as well as child laughter from the doors of their
room, and several reports of strange knocks on the door are also heavily detailed. Should
you hear a knock on your door in Ballygally Castle, one would hope it is simply the housekeeper. Number 1. The Stanley Hotel: One of the several
spectacular resorts calling the Rockies its home, The Stanley Hotel lies in Estes Park,
Colorado, with architecture resembling a mix of the original thirteen colonies and southern
architecture. The area surrounding the hotel is one of the earliest settlements within
Colorado, with residents dating back to 1872. The Stanley Hotel was opened on the 4th of
July 1909, and later was added to the National Register of Historic Places. With it’s 100
plus years of operation, the hotel has its fair share of history, and not all of it has
left. The Stanley is supposedly haunted, with countless apparitions being spotted throughout
the grounds. The ghosts of Freelan and Flora Stanley have been seen in formal dress on
the main staircase, in the lobby and wandering around the grounds together. People have reported
hearing disembodied voices and loud footsteps in their rooms and down the hallways, despite
there being no one present. Guests have also awoken to find their blankets taken off their
bed and neatly folded beside them. Two rooms have peaked the interest of guests; the first
is room 418, claimed to be the most haunted room of the hotel. Guests and staff have heard
the sounds of children laughing and playing, and guests have complained of the children
being too loud, even though now children were present on that floor. Room 217 has a tragic
history, after a gas explosion nearly killed housekeeper Elizabeth Wilson in 1911. After
her death in the 1950s, she has since taken up permanent residence in 217, opening and
closing doors, flickering the lights, and even making appearances to guests. Author
Stephen King stayed in this room at the Stanley, and he has credited this visit as his inspiration
for the best-selling novel The Shining.