Top 15 Scary Coincidences That Actually Happened

Top 15 Scary Coincidences That Actually Happened

August 10, 2019 100 By William Hollis


Number 15. The Fates of Richard Parker: Edgar Allan Poe
is considered the greatest author of gothic literature. His stories The Raven and The Telltale Heart
continue to capture the praise of readers today. Poe has also written several lesser known
stories as good as his others. In 1838, he published his only novel, the
Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. In the halfway point of the novel, the ship
Grampus becomes damaged, and their supplies run out. Desperate for food, the crew draws straws,
and the person with the shortest straw to be cooked and eaten. Crewman Richard Parker ends up being killed
and eaten. Only two people survive to be rescued in the
end. A grisly tale, and one which Poe himself described
silly, but the story turned reality in 1884. The yacht Mignonette departed England and
set sail towards Sydney, Australia. The yacht was definitely too small to travel
that distance, and they didn’t bring anywhere near enough supplies. After the ship sank, the crew were stranded
on a lifeboat. As in Poe’s novel, the crew initially caught
a turtle and ate it, but soon after one of the crewman began to deteriorate. Knowing there was no hope to safe their comrade,
the rest of the crew killed him and consumed him. The extra eerie part of the story is the crewman’s
name was Richard Parker. After the others were rescued, they went on
trial for murder and were initially sentenced to hang, but were then given only a six month
sentence. Number 14. The Unlucky Mongols: Few empires surpass the
mass that was the Mongol Empire. Stretching from Korea to Hungary, Siberia
to Southeast Asia, only the British held more territory than the Mongols. Mongols were known to be fierce warriors easily
taking over foe after foe. One place they never managed to conquer was
Japan, though not from lack of trying. In 1274, 15,000 Mongol and Chinese soldiers
embarked towards Japan, initially making gains against the outnumbered Japanese. Then, just as Mongol reinforcements and supplies
were sailing across the sea, a massive typhoon ripped through the fleet and 13,000 soldiers
and sailors drowned. The now undersupplied Mongol invasion force
were forced to surrender, and the two nations entered an uneasy peace. Less than a decade later, the Mongols tried
again in 1281, but this time the Japanese caught word of the invasion and had better
time to prepare 40,000, but a force of over 100,000 combined forces were en route to invade
Japan. Unfortunately for them, setbacks delayed the
Chinese fleet, meaning the smaller Korean forces made up of conscripts had to face the
Japanese alone for a time. When the main force finally landed, it looked
as if the Japanese were about to meet their match. Then, in a strange twist of fate, a typhoon
smashed into the fleet of 4000 Mongol ships, leaving tens of thousands dead and only a
few hundred ships surviving. It would appear the gods were on Japan’s side,
and were determined to hault Mongol expansion into the Pacific. This final devastating blow was the last straw
and Kublai Khan withdrew his forces from Japan, never to return. The Mongols may have outnumbered the Japanese
in number of soldiers, but Japan outnumbered them in luck. Number 13. Identical Twins, Identical Lives: With many
twins looking identical in every way possible, it’s no surprise people joke they can live
very similar lives. For this pair, the similarities are so striking
it goes from silly to ludicrous, if overwhelmingly intriguing. Born in 1940, James and James were adopted
three weeks after their birth and were both named James by their respective adoptive parents. However, the coincidences stop far from there. Both owned dogs named Toy, excelled in math
and carpentry, married women named Linda, divorced, and then remarried women named Betty. The most surprising part of the story is the
two hadn’t met each other at all prior to these developments. James Lewis lived in Lima, Ohio, while James
Springer lived in Piqua, Ohio, 48 kms away from one another, and Springer’s mother believed
his brother had passed away. However, Lewis’ mother revealed she overheard
his brother had been adopted as well, so Lewis made an effort to find him and reunite. With information provided by the local court,
Lewis contacted Springer and the two met four days later, both aged 39. It was during this meeting their similarities
came to light, with the addition of similar tension headaches, and smoking the same brand. The two formed an instant bond and have an
unbreakable relationship since their meeting in 1979. The amazing story has sparked interests of
researchers studying twins to determine if there is some sort of mental connection. With similar stories of amazing coincidences
with twins separated at birth, nothing comes to how incredible the story of the two James’s
are. Number 12. The Lincoln-Kennedy Connection: Ask anyone
who they believe the best president was, Abraham Lincoln and John Kennedy are likely to be
on someone’s top 5. Both were president during turbulent times
in American history, Lincoln during the American Civil War and Kennedy during the peak of the
Cold War. The two also had their lives cut short by
an assassin’s bullet, but their legacies continue to live on. Observant people have noticed strange similarities
between both presidents, despite them being 100 years apart. For example, both died of head wounds, Lincoln
was elected in 1860, Kennedy in 1960, both defeated former Vice Presidents running for
office, Lincoln was shot in Ford’s Theatre and Kennedy was shot while riding in a Ford
vehicle, and both were succeeded by Southern-borns, Lincoln by Andrew Jackson of Tennessee and
Kennedy by Lyndon Johnson of Texas. The coincidences have sparked an urban legend,
which also claims Lincoln had a secretary named Kennedy and Kennedy had a secretary
named Lincoln. This claim is untrue, as no documents show
this to be the case. One creepy element which is true is both had
bodyguards named William. Lincoln’s bodyguard William H. Cook advised
Lincoln not to attend he performance in Ford’s Theatre, while Kennedy’s bodyguard William
Geer drove Kennedy through Dallas, and had expressed his concerns of the president attending
the parade. While most of the claims of a connection between
Kennedy and Lincoln are untrue, the ones that are were all listed here. While a direct connection between both assassinations
are unlikely, given the amount of time between both instances, it does call for speculation
as to what else could be similar between both stories. Number 11. Mark Twain’s Comet: Mark Twain is a legend
best known for the classics The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Adventures of Huckleberry
Finn. Born Samuel Langhorne Clemens on November
30, 1835 and lived 74 years until April 21, 1910. During his life, he became one of the best
known authors in American history. What grants him a place on the list is his
relation with the renowned Halley’s Comet. This astrological phenomenon is the only comet
visible to the naked eye, and visits near Earth orbit every 74 to 79 years. Last time it seen was in 1986 and it won’t
return until 2061. Twain was born only days after Halley’s Comet
reappeared in 1835, and in 1909 was quoted saying “I came in with Halley’s Comet in
1835. It’s coming again next year, and I expect
to go with it.” Quite the declaration, and he even said it
would be his greatest letdown if the comet came and went, and he lived after. Sure enough, Halley’s Comet came back the
following year, in what was its brightest show yet. The following day, Twain suffered a heart
attack and passed away. On top of literary genius, it would seem Twain
also held the ability to predict the future. Twain got his wish to leave with Halley’s
Comet, and his books are still enjoyed by many to this day. Number 10. Sacagawea’s Lost Family: The Lewis and Clark
expedition could not have succeeded had they neglected to hire Sacagawea. Born around 1788 in Idaho, she was captured
by Hidatsa natives at age twelve and later sold to a French Canadian trapper who made
her his wife. Sacagawea was introduced to Lewis and Clark
when they hired her husband, Toussaint Charbonneau as they settled in North Dakota for the winter
of 1804-05. Charbonneau was to be an interpreter, and
Sacagawea was also brought along for these duties. She proved to be valuable by helping find
edible plants, and knowing the area and language of the natives they encountered. She even dived into a river to retrieve important
supplies and documents after their boat sank. As they reached the Rocky Mountains, the group
encountered a group of Shoshone natives, whom they negotiated to buy horses from. Things didn’t start off well, but suddenly
the tribe’s Chief Cameahwait walked towards the expedition. In a coincidence of good fortune, Sacagawea
immediately recognized Cameahwait as her lost brother, and the two had a sweet reunion. With this, Sacagawea successfully negotiated
buying horses from Cameahwait. Had Cameahwait not been there, or if Sacagawea
not joined the expedition, Lewis and Clark would have either needed to find another place
to buy horses or spend more than they could afford. The reunion was short, as Sacagawea continued
with Lewis and Clark, but it certainly provided both with closure and assurance of the other’s
survival. Number 9. Tamerlane’s Curse: Behind a great Empire is
a great ruler. Tamerlane was one of the several Mongol Khans
to form an empire based on the one Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan. Tamerlane’s empire, encompassed all of Modern
Iran, Iraq, Syria, the Caucuses Afghanistan, and parts of Turkey. Lasting nearly 125 years, Tamerlane died in
1405 of a flu, and his empire fell one hundred years later. Tamerlane issued a warning to those who would
dare disturb his resting place, saying “Whosoever disturbs my tomb will unleash an invader more
terrible than I am.” Quite a terrifying curse, considering Tamerlane’s
conquests resulted in 17 million people losing their lives. While curses are mostly seen as nothing but
empty threats, Tamerlane’s appeared to come true. When the Soviet Union uncovered the tomb in
1941, the researchers were unaware of the curse they had unleashed. The local Uzbek citizens begged the excavation
to end, panicked an unstoppable army will soon sweep through Russia, leaving destruction
in its wake. The dig continued and the tomb was opened
on June 19th, and the next day, Tamerlane’s coffin was opened and his remains examined. On June 22nd, as if true to Tamerlane’s words,
Nazi Germany began their invasion of the Soviet Union. During their defence of their homeland and
consequent offense towards Berlin, an estimated grand total of 8.3 million soviets passed
away. While the Soviets were successful in the end,
they came close to defeat on several occasions and lost more people than any other participant
in second World War. This proves how people should not take curses
lightly, or they may be subjected to disastrous consequences. Number 8. The 27 Club: Celebrity passings are a tragedy,
and with every one who passes, people from all over pay tribute. Throughout the years, several high ranking
celebrities have passed away at 27, leading people to believe the age is cursed. Between 1969 and 1971, musicians Brian Jones,
Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jim Morrison all died at age 27, as a result of substances. These passings were the initial inception
of the idea of a 27 Club, but the idea truly ballooned into an idea with the passing of
Kurt Cobain in 1994. This coincidence became too great to be ignored
at this point, and people wondered if there was a reason all these people died at 27. This has, as mentioned above, led to the belief
the age is cursed, or even the speculation there is a greater conspiracy of either the
government or some other organization killing off celebrities who encourage youth rebellion
of social norms. Even today, the list grows. Most notably, Amy Winehouse in 2011 and Anton
Yeltchin in 2016. While notable cases have involved substance
abuse, many of been caused by illness, accidents and sadly suicide. The phenomenon has led to scientific study
to determine if the age 27 does have a higher probability of passing away for people than
other ages. The British Medical Journal in 2011 found
no such higher risk, although most of the celebrities they studied did pose a greater
risk health wise due to their substance consumption, although the age 27 is simply a scary coincidence. It is safe to say there is no outside force
contributing to the 27 Club, but there is no telling who will be its next member. Number 7. The Wrecks of the Titans: The Titanic is the
most well known oceanic disasters in all of history. At the time the largest ship ever built, the
Titanic was a modern wonder, meant to carry the richest of people from Southhampton, UK
to New York. It set sail on April 10, 1912, but horror
struck after it hit an iceberg four days after launch near Newfoundland. The haul was breached and the ship sunk, killing
1500 people. It came as a shock to many people, as the
ship was declared unsinkable by the builders. It was considered an unpredictable event,
but as it turns out, it was unintentionally predicted by a novel written 14 years prior. The Wreck of the Titan was written by Morgan
Robertson in 1898, and tells the story of John Rowland. After his discharge from the Navy, he becomes
a deckhand on the titular Titan, which hits an iceberg and sinks. Aside from the similar names, both the Titan
and Titanic sank in April, Titan was 800 feet long while Titanic was 882 feet long, both
were called unsinkable, didn’t have enough lifeboats for all the passengers, and the
list goes on. The similarities between the Titan and Titanic
have led people to label Robertson as a soothsayer. However, Robertson dismissed the claims as
ridiculous, saying his similarities are due to his knowledge in shipbuilding and basing
the Titan’s events around that. With the Titanic now immortalized in history,
it’s a shame the novel doesn’t share the same popularity it did back when it was released. Read it for yourself, and see how eerily similar
both events are. Number 6. The Rise of a Tyrant: Franz von Stuck was
a German painter known for his dark depictions in his artwork. In 1889, he painted a piece titled The Wild
Chase, which shows Germanic god Wotan riding a horse, sword in hand. It is one of Stuck’s darker paintings, but
it would turn out to be much darker than predicted. One of Stuck’s admirers was Adolf Hitler,
particularly during his days as an artist. From here, Hitler needs no further explanation,
but those who have seen the painting have noticed disturbing similarities between it
and Hitler’s legacy. Furthermore, Wotan in the painting resembles
Hitler, leading people to believe Stuck had predicted Hitler’s rise to power and the wave
of destruction he brought with him. It’s easy to believe such things, since the
painting is uncannily foreboding, and to top it all off, 1889 is the year Hitler was born. However, most people believe it was this painting
that partially inspired Hitler’s strive for greatness, hoping to embody the image of Wotan
Stuck had painted. It is certainly an unsettling set of coincidences
in the year it was painted and Wotan’s facial characteristics, and the legacy a madman later
brought to the world. Number 5. Inspiration Becomes Reality: At nine years
old, Jerry Parr was awed by Ronald Reagan’s performance in Code of the Secret Service,
in which Reagan plays Secret Service agent Brass Bancroft. Working his way through school, Parr was sworn
into the ranks of the Secret Service in 1962, working on protective surveys domestically
and internationally. He eventually worked his way up to Special
Agent in Charge and Head of the White House Detail in the late 1970s. So, imagine his surprise when he discovered
the president he would next be protecting was none other than Reagan, the very man who
inspired his career choice. Only two months after Reagan’s inauguration,
Reagan visited Ford’s Theatre for a charity event, and later recalled an uneasy feeling
upon spotting Abraham Lincoln’s box seat the night he was shot. He later made a speech at the Washington Hilton
Hotel, and then left to return to the White House with his wife, the Secret Service escorting
him in full force. Parr was present, walking behind Reagan and
observing the perimeter. Also present was one John Hinkley, Jr., a
disturbed man hoping to impress actress Jodie Foster. As Reagan waved to the crowd, Hinkley drew
a pistol and fired several shots, hitting four people before being detained by Secret
Service and police. Parr immediately went into action and tackled
Reagan into the limousine. However, Reagan felt pain in his chest and
had trouble breathing. Parr discovered Reagan had been hit in the
chest, and immediately ordered the driver to the hospital. Initially in critical condition, surgeons
were able to save Reagan’s life, and he continued his duties as president until 1989. Parr’s quick reactions saved Reagan from greater
harm, and he saw his calling to become an agent as a sign from god. He became a Pastor later in life before passing
away of natural causes in 2015. Number 4. The Man of the Civil War: Imagine being present
for the beginning and the end of a the most costly conflict your country has ever faced. The American Civil War between 1861 and 1865,
and was the most devastating conflict the United States has been involved in, including
the First and Second World Wars. While the war began after the Battle of Fort
Sumter, the first major battle fought was the First Battle of Bull Run. There to witness the first stages of attack
was Wilmer McLean, a resident of Manassas, Virginia. The clash took place on McLean’s farm, which
was being used as a Confederate headquarters for General P.G.T Beauregard. Throughout the conflict, McLean supplied the
Confederate Army, but soon decided to move after the area was a frequent skirmish point. He and his family settled 190 kms away in
Appomattox County, Virginia. On April 9, 1865, Confederate General Robert
E. Lee and remnants of the Confederate Army sought refuge in the Appomattox Court House,
the very home McLean had made his own in 1863. McLean, a simple grocer, had been present
for the beginning and the end of major hostilities between American and Confederate forces, as
if fate destined him to be there to see both events. It was in the parlor of McLean’s home in Appomattox
where Lee signed the final surrender in McLean’s parlor room. Later, McLean would joke “The war began
in my front yard and ended in my front parlor.” Two years after the war ended, the McLean’s
returned to Manassas and later settled in Alexandria, where Wilmer worked for the IRS
for three years. He passed away in 1882. Today, McLean’s house in Appomattox is now
a historical landmark for the significance, and McLean continues to be known as the man
who saw the war begin and end on his property. Number 3. The Last Day of Adams and Jefferson: Two of
the most famous individuals in the course of the American Revolution and independence
were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams was the second president following George
Washington, and Jefferson was third. While allies through and through, ideologically
the two men clashed. Adams strived for further centralization of
the American government, while Jefferson advocated to federalize the new country. In fact, it was what Jefferson perceived Adams’
abuse of power during his tenure which led Jefferson to run against him in the 1800 election. As most know, Jefferson won and served two
terms. He is celebrated for his efforts to expand
west through the Lewis and Clark expedition. The two had a falling out, but were able to
rekindle their friendship through a series of letters in 1812, continuing for the next
14 years. On July 4, 1826, both men were gravely ill. Both men would not live to see the next day. These were the last survivors of the original
revolutionaries, and they both passed away on the 50th anniversary they and the other
figures signed the Declaration of Independence, declaring the United States as a sovereign
nation. For both of them to pass away on the same
day is nothing more than incredible, considering how important their roles were in that stage
of the revolution. Interestingly enough, Adams’ last recorded
words were “Thomas Jefferson still survives,” not knowing his friend had passed peacefully
hours before. Adams was known to promise he would live to
see the 50th anniversary of the signing, and he made true to his word, just barely. Thankfully, he and Jefferson were able to
bury the hatchet, and left this world together as friends. Number 2. The May ’44 Crossword: In the first and second
quarter of 1944, the Western Allies were already preparing a series of invasions to help relieve
Soviet forces in the East, and in order to regain territory lost to the Germans and Italians. The grand plan was known as Operation Overlord,
more commonly referred today as D-Day. Members of the American, British, Canadian,
and various other allied nations would storm the beaches of Normandy to create a beachhead
for troops and supplies to operate on mainland Europe. This plan was meant to be the beginning of
the end, and military intelligence had worked hard to throw the Germans off the scent. Things were going well, and intelligence indicated
German forces had taken the bait and believed the Allies would land on the beaches near
Calais, which was the shortest route across the English Channel. In May, just a month before the landing, intelligence
officers began to notice a strange series of answers in the Daily Telegraph crossword
puzzel. On May 2nd, the solution to the clue “One
of the U.S.” was Utah, a codename for the western most beach. On the 22nd, the word Omaha was an answer,
then on the 27th, it was Overlord, the Mulberry on the 30th, and finally Neptune on June 1st. All were codewords relating to D-Day, and
military staffed were now panicked. MI5 quickly began an investigation and arrested
the school teacher Melville Jones and Telegraph crossword writer Leonard Dawe, who had created
the crosswords. It was common for spies on both sides to send
secret messages in newspapers, so it was suspected this was the case. However, upon Jones’s interrogation, it was
discovered Jones and Dawe would create the puzzles based on suggestions made by students,
and one of them was getting the ideas from a Military Notebook he had. Quite the scary coincidence for what is supposed
to be of the greatest of secrets, but luckily just a false alarm. D-Day went on as scheduled, and the rest is
history. Before we get to number 1, my name is Chills
and I hope you’re enjoying my narration. If you’re curious about what I look like
in real life, then go to my instagram, @dylan_is_chillin_yt and tap that follow button to find out. I’m currently doing a super poll on my Instagram,
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video to find out the number 1 entry. Also follow me on Twitter @YT_Chills because
that’s where I post video updates. It’s a proven fact that generosity makes you
a happier person, so if you’re generous enough to hit that subscribe button and the bell
beside it then thank you. This way you’ll be notified of the new videos
we upload every Tuesday and Saturday. Number 1. One Day in Sarajevo: If there is one single
event thought to have changed the world, it would be the events which transpired on June
23, 1914. At the end of the 19th and beginning of the
20th century, tensions began to mount between the European powers. Going deeper, the large Austro-Hungarian Empire
began to splinter as the various ethnic groups within demanded their independence. One of the loudest groups were the Serbians
living in the recently annexed Bosnia. As a means to ease tensions, heir to the throne
Archduke Franz Ferdinand visited the city of Sarajevo on that fateful day, officially
to meet with officials and parade through the city, but truthfully to celebrate his
anniversary with his wife. Members of a group called Young Bosnia, part
of the greater Black Hand, plotted to assassinate Ferdinand as a means to cause chaos within
the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. While Ferdinand and his wife rode through
the streets, cell after cell of Young Bosnia were either spooked by police or lost their
nerve, but one man threw a grenade at the car. It missed, and instead injured several guards
and civilians. The car fled and was gone. The remaining member to have not fled was
Gavrilo Princip, who wandered through the streets, devastated, and contemplating what
to do. Meanwhile, Ferdinand and his wife decided
to visit the injured at the hospital and entered the car again. However, the car got lost, took a wrong turn
and stalled outside a café. There at a table outside was Princip eating
a sandwich. Knowing this could be his last opportunity,
he stood and fired two shots into the open car. Ferdinand and his wife were dead within an
hour. In what is by far the most disastrous coincidence
in history, a simple wrong turn and bad timing eventually led to the First World War, which
engulfed all of Europe and parts of the world into a conflict no one had seen before. Had it gone any other way, our world could
be drastically different today.