Top 5 Scariest Ghost Ships That Haunt The Sea – Part 3

Top 5 Scariest Ghost Ships That Haunt The Sea – Part 3

October 19, 2019 72 By William Hollis


As the old saying goes–what is an ocean but
a multitude of drops–and yet, terrifyingly for us, several of those drops in question
seem to be spectral vessels that have since haunted the Seven Seas, steering their way
toward ghostly plunder and eternal servitude to the murky depths. Well, I mean–that was David Mitchell–but
still, it sounds pretty cool, right? The point is, over several parts of this list–we’ve
scoured the ships manifest and detailed some of the most haunting and horrifying historical
entries of shanties and watery tales–and luckily for us, there’s still plenty more
where that came from. Let’s take a look, shall we? Hello horror fans, what’s going on–and
once again, welcome back to the scariest channel on YouTube–Top 5 Scary Videos. As per usual, I’ll be your horror host Jack
Finch–as today, we curiously take a look at the Top 5 Scariest Ghost Ships That Haunt
The Sea — Part 3. Roll the clip. For the curious amongst you, that scene was
from 1979’s Dracula–starring Frank Langella and Laurence Olivier–of course, based upon
Bram Stoker’s classic gothic novel of the same name. And when we’re talking about ghost ships–yeah,
you know what’s worse? Vampire death ships. I mean, I don’t think I need to clear up
exactly why that’s the worse thing. But hey–luckily for us, vampire death ships
remain to be fictional. Well, I mean–there was that one time, but
that’s by the by. Let’s take a look. Kicking off at Number 5–The Caleuche And for this first foray into these particular
Ghost Ships that haunt the sea–we’re going to be heading over to the mythologies of Chile,
and the many legends that have been built around it’s coastal landscape. One of those, according to Chilean legend–is
that of the Caleuche, a large ghost ship that sails the seas of Chiloe–a small island just
off the coast–where it only ever appears at night. The ship itself is said to appear as beautiful–cast
in a bright white light, an enormous vessel with 3 masts and 5 sails each. It is said that when The Caleuche appears–it
is always at night–and always full of lights with the sounds of a great party and feast
on board. Quickly though, it disappears–plunging back
beneath the murky depths. Interestingly enough though, although this
vessel is said to be similar to The Flying Dutchman, there is a boatload of mythology
relating to this particular legend. One of these versions claims that the vessel
is crewed by the drowned–souls lost at sea–who are brought to the ship by three mythological
figures in Chilean legend. Two sisters, one of them the sirena chilota,
a type of mermaid–and the other the Pincoya, a type of water spirit said to protect the
Chilean coast–and then their brother, the Pincoy–their male counterpart who has the
body of a sea lion. Once aboard–the perished souls can resume
their existence in an eternal revery of adventure. However, there is a much more sinister version
of this legend–which states that the crew of The Caleuche instead sail the Chiloe Archipelago,
luring fishermen and sailors toward it with enchanting music to enslave them as part of
their crew for eternity–where they are twisted and contorted and put to work in their afterlife. Yeah… I’m pretty sure I prefer the first version. Swinging in at Number 4 — The Eliza Battle And for this one–we’re pinching the parameters
of the seven seas–and instead, we’re taking a look at one of the most notorious maritime
disasters–that instead of on an ocean, occurred on a river–The Tombigbee River to be precise,
a stretch of water that runs between Columbus, Mississippi and Mobile, Alabama. And here, we have the legend of the The Phantom
Steamboat of the Tombigbee. Back in 1852–one of the largest river steamboats
constructed at the time, The Eliza Battle–was put into service between the two Southern
States. During one particularly cold February in the
winter of 1858, after the Eliza Battle had departed the city of Columbus–the ship made
its way downriver, stopping on the way at Pickensville, Gainesville, Demopolis–and
several other small river landings. By the time that the steamboat had left off
at Demopolis though, it was filled to the rafters with passengers–and not only passengers,
but also over 1200 bales of cotton to be ferried to the final stop. Now, although it roughly still remains a mystery–around
2 AM on March 1st 1858–about 30 miles downriver from Demopolis, the crew of the Eliza Battle
awoke startled to discover that the cotton bales on the main deck were on fire. Flames soared and quickly engulfed the ships
hull–soon spreading out of control despite the frigid temperatures, attributed to the
oddly gusty evening. The boat continued onward through–the entirety
of its exterior completely engulfed in flames–and cut off from their lifeboats, the passengers–many
of them who had awoken dressed in their nightclothes–were forced to plunge into the icy river below. Now, some of them survived–mainly by floating
atop the remaining cotton bales–but all in all, over thirty-three people lost their lives–both
crew and passengers included. The Eliza Battle quickly sank beneath the
water–the wreckage of which still lingers at the bottom of the Tombigbee River. It is said though, on a particularly cold
and windy night–the Eliza Battle will emerge from the icy fog–engulfed in flames once
again–a warning sign of an oncoming ill omen. Next up at Number 3–The Fireship of Baie
des Chaleurs Which, I mean–come on guys, that’s probably
the most awesome sounding title to anything on these historical lists, right? The Fireship of Baie des Chaleurs, sounds
like something that Geralt of Rivia himself would sail down to Skellige after a summer
in Toussaint–but whatever, that’s by the by–because this vessel in question actually
takes us over to the eternally autumnal Eastern tones of New Brunswick, Canada. Now, the Fireship of Baie des Chaleurs, is
also more commonly referred to as the Chaleur Phantom or the Phantom Ship–and it often
takes the form of a series of ghost lights just before a storm, appearing as a large,
three mast galley. Now, the actual mechanics of this phenomenon
are dubiously debated–and many believe it’s cause to be down to either the weather phenomenon
of St. Elmo’s fire–or an undersea release of natural gas after a patch of rotting vegetation
just off the New Brunswick coast. I mean–that’s a completely different story
entirely, but what we’re concerned with–is the actual origin of the Fireship. The history of which, is equal parts tragic
and gruesome. As the legend goes–back in 1501–a Portuguese
captain had spent a year pillaging the coast of Baie des Chaleurs, capturing Mi’kmaw
natives for the slave trade. However, his cutthroat agenda was miscalculated–as
a year later, when he returned to the region on his second trip, he was captured–tortured
and killed by the Mi’kmaq people in revenge for their kidnapped people. The legend didn’t end there though–because
a year later, the brother of the Portuguese Captain sailed to the Bay in search of his
missing sibling–and upon seeing the same flags, the Mi’kmaq people attacked the ship–setting
it ablaze whilst it was moored in the bay. Cut off, burning–and with certain death facing
them–the sailors swore to haunt the bay for a thousand years–as their blazing fireship
sank into the Baie des Chaleurs. Now, whilst later both Mi’kmaw and Portuguese
casualties washed up on the shores of the island, the Bay itself is said to be haunted
by those that perished–often appearing as distraught sailors and warriors, their flesh
burnt by the Fireship. Swinging in at Number 2 — The Princess Augusta And on the topic of ghostly phenomenon, this
particular apparition is perhaps one of the most well documented ghost ships of the 18th
century–although the actual history behind it is shrouded in intrigue. Although the folklore account of this particular
vessel is based upon the historical wreck of the Princess Augusta, a ship that sailed
out of Rotterdam in August 1738 under the command of Captain George Long–in more modern
records, it is commonly referred to as the Palatine, where the Palatine Light–the apparition
in question, famously gets its name. And the reason for that, is down to the nature
of the ship. Alongside 14 of his crew, Captain Long’s
directive was to transport 240 German Immigrants, from the Palatinate Region of the Rhineland–to
build a new life for themselves in Philadelphia. However, we know that this is the tale of
a ghost ship–and from the offset, their vessel was afflicted with some terribly tragic luck. Not long after passing through the Atlantic,
the Princess Augusta’s water supply was contaminated–causing a fever and flux to
spread through the ship, killing 200 of its passengers, half the crew–and the Captain
himself. The ship’s first mate, Andrew Brook, quickly
took command–as the survivors leapt out of the frying pan and into the fire, getting
hit by severe storms that pushed the ship far off course to the north. They endured three months of extreme weather
and dwindling supplies–when eventually they emerged, shipwrecked in Block Island, not
far from Rhode Island. Here, the tale splits–but one thing is certain. Andrew Brook, the First Mate and Commanding
Captain, took what remained of his crew and rowed ashore–without once looking back at
the cursed ship. It is said that some of the passengers survived,
aided by the Block Islanders–but little to nothing is known about those that survived
the voyage. As the legend goes, The Princess Augusta was
set alight from the coast in the dead of night–pushed out to sea to burn and disappear. At night, they say that if you listen closely–you
can hear the screams of those that didn’t make it back to shore. And finally, coming in at our Number 1 spot–The
Duc de Dantzig And for our most terrifying ghost ship on
this list–of course, it has to be a brutal and bloodthirsty Pirate Ship–a privateer
that plundered her way across the Caribbean–notoriously in the name of it’s royal namesake, The
Duke of Danzig. Now, after she was launched under the French
banner on 12th February 1808–the Duke of Dantzig–this ships seafaring career was relatively
quiet for the first few years of service–mainly acting as a letter of marque, a deterrent–more
so than a private man-of-war. However, her fate quickly changed–after changing
command, and sailing under the French Captain, Francois Aregnaudea. Now, his intentions were to sail and plunder
his way across the seven seas–and plunder he did, from Liverpool to Barbados–capturing
and scuttling more ships than he could count on his way. However, despite being a vessel of the French
Empire–strangely enough, sometime after late June 1812–The Duke of Danzig just… disappeared. Although there are several records catching
a glimpse of her around Canada–she was never seen again. After the last mention of her, it was thought
she had been destroyed by a tropical cyclone–or sunk in the night after an encounter with
a British Frigate, however–as the legend goes, that was not the last of the Duke of
Danzig. After the Golden Age of Piracy had been sated–a
captain by the name of Napoleon Gallois relayed his records of a French Frigate encountering
the wreck of the Duke of Danzig, drifting listlessly at sea. As his crew witnessed–the ship itself was
covered from helm to hull in dried blood–and in staggered rows, were the putrefying corpses
of her crew, many of which were brutally crucified to the masts or the deck. Strangely enough, there were no signs that
she had been in recent battle–in fact, despite the blood–she was pristine. No shot holes–and her sails and rigging intact. After searching the ship, Gallois’ crew
found a stack of blood stained papers, identifying the captain as the same Francois Aregnaudeau. As they left–the crew of the frigate set
the brig ablaze–forever to be buried at sea, along with its mystery. Well, there we have it horror fans–our list
for the Top 5 Scariest Ghost Ships That Haunt The Sea–what do you guys think? Do you have any more to add? Or just any intriguing insights of your own? Let us know your thoughts, as well as any
choice picks–down in the comment section below. Before we depart from today’s video, let’s
first take a quick look at some of your more creative comments from over the past few days. Vicky Wiley says— What does LLC in Hell House LLC mean? — Well Vicky, it stands for limited liability
company–and in Hell House’s case, I’m fairly confident that they didn’t have the
public liability to cover that kind of haunting. Yeah. There’s a business venture for you–paranormal
insurance. Well, before I give away any more of my trade
secrets–unfortunately that’s all we’ve got time for in today’s video, cheers for
sticking around all the way until the end. If you were a fan of this video, or just Top
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