Top 5 Scary Demons You Should Never Summon – Part 5

Top 5 Scary Demons You Should Never Summon – Part 5

November 8, 2019 100 By William Hollis


Alright horror fans – you didn’t think we
could do it, but of course we can – because we’re the finest purveyors of the arcane
rites and passages of the ancient world, and it seems to be apparent that the majority
of you have a healthy appetite and understanding of demonic literature. So, we better deliver on our part, and once
more, dive back into the dusty tomes and grimoires of a bygone age – when the planet was rife
with the nefarious machinations of demonic entities and malententious sorcery. Oh, and – it goes with the territory really,
but don’t summon any of these please, guys. If anything, it’s just bad manners. You’ve been warned. Hello horror fans – and welcome back to the
scariest channel on YouTube – Top 5 Scary Videos. As per usual, I’ll be your horror host Jack
Finch – as we utter a few household incantations – and take a look at the Top 5 Scary Demons
You Should Never Summon – Part 5. Roll the clip. For the curious amongst you, that clip was
of Halfrek the Vengeance Demon from the classic 90’s masterpiece of a TV series, Buffy the
Vampire Slayer – and if you don’t love Buffy, what the hell are you doing here? Kicking off at Number 5 – Namtar And this guy is pretty savage. Although, it kind of comes with the territory
when you’re the literal Mesopotamian god of death. Namtar, also known as Namtaru or Namtara – is
loosely translated into destiny or fate in the ancient Mesopotamian language, and was
considered to be a chthonic minor deity in the mythologies of the ancient world. Just a little side note – chthonic is an absolutely
awesome word – and it literally means “subterranean” in ancient Greek. Chthonic. Cthulhu. I see what you’re getting at there. Namtar was considered to be the god of death,
and minister and messenger of An, Ereshkigal and Nergal – the three major figures of ancient
Mesopotamia and Sumerian mythology. He was considered to be responsible for diseases
and pests, and it was said that he commanded over sixty diseases, that emerged in the form
of demons that could penetrate different parts of the human body. In other Sumerian texts, Namtar was widely
considered to be the personification of death, much like the modern concept of the Grim Reaper
– and he held dominion over the fate of mankind. Pretty heavy responsibility. Coming in at Number 4 – Rangda In Balinese folklore, there are some insanely
terrifying creatures known as the Leyaks – a creature in the form of a flying decapitated
head with bloody entrails still attached, that seek out pregnant women in order to suck
her baby’s blood. Well, let me introduce you to their queen. Rangda – and she is absolutely horrifying. In Balinese mythology, Rangda is the child-eating
leader of an army of evil witches, in constant battle against her eternal opponent, Barong
– leader of the army of light and the forces of good. Rangda is often depicted as a mostly nude
old woman, with long, unkempt hair – pendulous breasts and claws. Traditionally, her face is a horrifying fanged
and goggle-eyed mask with a long, protruding tongue. It is often thought that Rangda played her
part in the incarnation of Calon Arang, a legendary witch in Javanese folklore that
wreaked havoc throughout the late 10th century. Calong Arang sacrificed her own daughter to
Rangda at her Temple of Death, and unleashed a great flood of death and disease. Gnarly stuff. Next up at Number 3 – Naberius And this horrifying little dude first appeared
in the grimoire, From The Deceptions of Demons, written in 1583 by Johann Weyer, the famed
Dutch occultist and demonologist. Supposedly, Naberius is the most valiant Marquess
of Hell, and has nineteen legions of demons within his sphere of influence. His intention is to make men cunning in all
arts – but his most prolific intention is to make them cunning in rhetoric, the ability
to influence with one’s voice. Naberius speaks with a hoarse voice, and also
procures lost honors and dignities – as in, he collects people of weak morals. Naberius appears in the form of a three-headed
dog or a raven, and presents himself with a loud and raucous voice – but speaks eloquently
and amiable. Concerning the name Naberius, it is often
thought throughout demonic literature that he is associated to the Greek Cerberus – the
three headed dog that guards the gates of Hades. In his grimoire, Johann Weyer considers them
to be one and the same – so I guess this guy was making the rounds. Swinging in at Number 2 – Moloch And now we’re getting into some pretty gruesome
ground in ancient history. Moloch – oftentimes referred to as Molech,
Milcom and Malcam – is the biblical name of a Canaanite god associated with child sacrifice. He often appears in the image of a large,
ferocious humanoid Bull, dressed in flowing robes and golden tipped horns. Ancient Rabbinical tradition depicts Moloch
as a bronze statue, which is heated with fire into which the victims of his sacrifice were
thrown. This is tied to ancient Greco-Roman texts
that associate this act of child sacrifice to Carthage, and their worship of Baal Hammon. Moloch has traditionally been interpreted
as the name of a god – possibility meaning “the king” – but is also pejoratively
mispronounced with the Hebrew vocalisation – bosheth, meaning shame. Moloch is the shameful king, a creature of
metal and fire – that consumed countless children in ancient civilization. And that makes him pretty terrifying. And finally – coming in at our Number 1 spot
– Asmodeus And this guy is one of the biggest players
in the entire host of demonic entities throughout literature. Asmodeus, also known as Ashmedai or Ashema
Deva, is a grand king of demons – or in Judeo-Islamic lore, the king of the earthly spirits. He is mostly known from the deuterocanonical
Book of Tobit, where he is the primary antagonist – and the great prime evil. Asmodeus is often referred to as one of the
seven princes of Hell – where each one of these princes represents the seven deadly
sins – Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Envy, Pride – and the sin of Asmodeus – Lust. This guy is perhaps one of the most prolific
demonic entities in literature, and appears countless times throughout mythological and
religious texts. He is tied to the Testament of Solomon, and
the creation lore of the Temple of Solomon, where he began a campaign of malintent against
the legendary King. In the Malleus Maleficarum, he is described
as having 72 legions of demons under his command, and serves only his emperor Lucifer. He incites gambling, and is the overseer of
all the gambling houses in the court of Hell. Now that’s a table I’d never want to sit
at. And on that note – I guess the house, always
wins. There we have it guys, our part five in the
Top 5 Scary Demons You Should Never Summon series – let us know your thoughts in the
comment section down below. Before we depart though, you know the drill
by now – let’s read out some of your more creative comments from over the past few days. First up, BetwixtBetween – which is a great
name by the way – says — I don’t know what Jack’s career goals are, but can a casting
agent please hire him to act in a horror film please? Or at least do a cameo as a horror fan youtuber.
— and hell yes, I’ve never acted before in my life BetwixtBetween, but I’m so down
to be a part of a horror film – so yeah, if you’re listening casting agents, hit me
up. Carlos Eduardo Vieria Lemos says — Oh guys,
which class of SCP is Jack? Safe, keter or euclid? — which is a great
question by the way, but then the reply is my favourite part — And Lincoln Busby says — Appolyon. — damn straight Lincoln Busby. Well there we have it horror fans, unfortunately
that’s all we’ve got time for in today’s video – cheers for sticking around all the
way until the end. If you were a fan of this video, make sure
to hit that thumbs up button – as well as that subscribe bell, and I’m be seeing you
in the next one. As per usual, I’ve been your horror host
Jack Finch, you’ve been watching Top 5 Scary Videos – and until next time, you take it
easy.