Top 5 Scary Haunted Places In West Virginia

Top 5 Scary Haunted Places In West Virginia

August 12, 2019 100 By William Hollis


With the sheer amount of history that West
Virginia has, it is no surprise that there is no shortage of hauntings and spooky tails
to surface from the state. For years, residents and tourists have reported
paranormal activity from across the land, with some more notable than others. So today on Top 5 Scary Videos, I’m going
to be counting down our list of the Top 5 Scary Haunted Places In West Virginia. Let’s jump in. 5 West Virginia Penitentiary
Opened all the way back in 1875, the West Virginia Penitentiary in Moundsville is said
to be one of the most haunted prisons in the states. The first building constructed on the site
was the North Wagon Gate, which was made with hand-cut sandstone. The state used prison labor during the process,
and work continued on this first phase up until 1876. Following completion, the prison consisted
of the North Wagon Gate, North and South cellblocks, a Kitchen, dining area, hospital and chapel,
as well as a 4-story tower connecting the two administration buildings. The prison also included space for female
inmates and personal living quarters for the warden and his family. One the prison opened, it houses 251 male
inmates, including some who helped construct the prison where they were incarcerated. The condition of the prison worsened throughout
the years, and the facility was eventually ranked as one of the Top 10 Most Violent Correctional
Facilities. On Wednesday, November 7th. 1979, fifteen prisoners escaped from the prison,
one of them being Ronald Turney Williams who was serving time for murdering Sergeant David
Lilly of the Beckley Police Department. He managed to steal a guards weapon and reached
the streets where he encountered 23 year old off duty State Trooper Phillip S Kesner who
was driving past with his wife. Kesner attempted to take action against Williams
but he was shot in the process. The prison was home to riots, fires, and nearly
100 executions during its time in operation. To this day visitors have reported sightings
of phantom inmates and a shadow man wandering the premises, as well as unexplained voices
and cold spots. You can take tours around this haunted Penitentiary,
and even view the electric chair dubbed Old Sparky. For you brave souls out there, you can even
do an overnight session if you dare. 4 North Bend Rail Trail Tunnel No. 19
North Bend Rail Trail is located in Ritchie County in West Virginia and is a favorite
for hikers, cyclists and horseback riders traversing the 72 mile long trail. However, proceed with caution if you wind
up in the area, particularly around Tunnel No.19 also known as the Silver Run Tunnel. History goes that on one foggy evening in
1910, an engineer spied a young woman in a flowing white dress standing on the tracks. He brought the train to a stop but when he
searched for the woman she had vanished. He wasn’t the only one to spot her either,
many of his predecessors had as well. No one quite knows the origin of the woman
in white although some bones were found under a house near the tunnel. Some people say you can still spot her. Now, those who explore the tunnel are advised
to bring a flashlight, even during the day, with the tunnel being over 1,376 ft long which
is beyond sunlight’s reach. You have been warned. 3 Droop Mountain Battlefield
On November 6th, 1863, The battle of Droop Mountain occurred in Pocahontas County, West
Virginia during the American Civil War. Confederate forces engaged but failed to prevent
Union forces under General W.W. Averell from a rendezvous with other Federal
troops in a joint raid on Confederate railways. Droop Mountain was one of the largest engagements
in West Virginia during the war, and essentially resulted in the Confederate collapse. The battlefield site is now preserved and
administered by West Virginia as a state park, and the unknown Confederate dead are buried
in the confederate cemetery at Lewisburg. A wooden observation tower, hiking trails
and picnic tables mark the grounds where the Civil War soldiers fought, died, and some
say, still remain. Many visitors have reported sounds of galloping
horses and sightings of the ghosts of headless Confederate soldiers, as well as a soldier
lying asleep against a tree. 2 Lake Shawnee Amusement Park
In the late 1700s, the Clay family moved to West Virginia, which is presently known as
Mercer County. The Clay family, comprised of Mitchell and
his wife, settled on an 800 acre farm and raised 14 children, however, in 1783 tragedy
struck while Mitchell was out hunting. A few members of the Shawnee tribe killed
two of the Clay children and burned another at the stake. In retaliation Mitchell hunted down a handful
of Native Americans and killed them. The land in turn became unoccupied for years,
up until the early 1900s when Conley T. Snidow purchased the land and built a small amusement
park on it. However, the amusement park had just as unfortunate
luck as the Clay family. The park featured a ferris wheel and a swing
ride and was popular among locals, particularly families of coal miners who resided in the
area. In the early 1950’s a young girl on the
swing ride was killed when a truck delivering sodas accidentally backed into the ride, striking
her. Another child also drowned in the swimming
pool, which was subsequently filled in to prevent further accidents. During its operation, at least six people
died at the park, which resulted in the park ultimately closing in 1966. In 1985, Gaylord White, a former employee
of the park, purchased the land with plans to reopen. It happened, for a brief period that is before
the park closed again after a 1988 archeological dig uncovered numerous Native American artifacts,
as well as human remains on the property that has been buried prior to the arrival of Anglo-European
settles. In total, thirteen skeletons were uncovered,
mostly of young children. Perhaps the property is cursed, or perhaps
it is just a series of unfortunate events. Who knows. But one thing is for sure, it is one of the
most haunted places in the world. 1 Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum
The Trans-Allegheny Lunatic Asylum, also known as the Weston State Hospital, was a Kirkbride
psychiatric hospital that operated from 1864 to 1994 by the government. Originally built by Richard Andrews, it was
constructed from 1858 to 1881 and was originally designed to hold 250 people however, it became
overcrowded in the 1950’s, with the hospital housing 2,400 patients resulting in it being
forcibly closed in 1994 due to changes in patient treatment. Following its closure it was then purchased
by Joe Jordan in 2007, and is open for tours and other events to raise money for its restorations. During tours of the facility, witnesses have
reported doors slamming, shadowy figures and even blood curdling screams from within the
building’s walls. The Asylum has garnered such a spooky reputation
it has appeared on shows such as Ghost Stories, Ghost Hunters, Ghost Adventures, and Paranormal
Lockdown. It was also featured in Bethesda’s 2018
video games Fallout 76 under the name “Fort Defiance”, and acted as a base for The Brotherhood
of Steel, one of the game’s main factions. Well, there we have it! Do you guys agree with our list? Were there any haunted places that we missed? Leave us all your thoughts and feelings in
the comments down as well as what place you would like us to tackle next. If you haven’t already, be sure to give
this video a big thumbs up, subscribe, and turn on notifications so you never miss another
scary vid. And until next time, see ya later.